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Hi,

I am not trying to knick-pick anyone's writing but I think Cool Breeze used the word 'action' without the article like this.

More seriously, while is often used to refer to long-lasing action.

I look up my Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary and it noted like this among many otheres:

Action is doing something for a particular purpose

An action is something that you do on a particular ocassion.

How do we know which one is being used? Do you have any tips?
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Action is doing something for a particular purpose. Theoretical, about the notion. No article.

An action is something that you do on a particular ocassion. Practical, about an act. You can count them.
Comments  
Hi Believer,

The expression is nitpicking. To take action on something is to do something for a particular reason. Unfortunately, there is no easy rules we can use on when and how to apply article; particularly with the context of “action.



Reporting to the police is the proper action anyone should take when witnessing a crime being committed. Here, article is needed.



Long-lasting holding action is the trademark of this brand of hairspray. Here it needs no article.



Learners must learn to develop a sense as to when to apply article to a given context. Questions are fine but when questions are repeated over and over, it’s rather pointless.
 Marius Hancu's reply was promoted to an answer.