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In the fourth line, who was very pale and staring at the wall?

1. "I"

2. "Him"

3. Either "I" or "Him" according to context.

I think the correct option is 3 because context isn't enough.

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fire1In the fourth line, who was very pale and staring at the wall?

him

CJ

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CalifJimCalifJim

Is it grammatically acceptable to say "I looked at him, sitting at his desk"? If so, even if the comma is left out, is this sentence "I looked at him sitting at his desk" grammatically acceptable?

I think only the first sentence is correct because "him" as a pronoun is already specified, the part "sitting at his desk" is non-essential information, but I'm not sure.

fire1Is it grammatically acceptable to say "I looked at him, sitting at his desk"?

Yes. (Of course no one will hear the comma when you say it.)

fire1If so, even if the comma is left out, is this sentence "I looked at him sitting at his desk" grammatically acceptable?

Punctuation is not grammar. If you say this, no one will hear that there was no comma there.

So both sentences are equally grammatical.

fire1I think only the first sentence is correct because "him" as a pronoun is already specified, the part "sitting at his desk" is non-essential information, but I'm not sure.

There are all sorts of opinions about punctuation. The phrase 'sitting at his desk' is so short that some style manuals say that a comma is not necessary. A reader can work out the correct "non-essential" interpretation without the help of a comma.

There may be other style manuals that insist on the comma.

Follow the style manual as advised by your editor when you are about to publish your original research in a famous journal or when you are about to have your novel published. In the meantime you can pick your own style manual and follow that, or just make some educated guesses.

CJ

CalifJimfire1Is it grammatically acceptable to say "I looked at him, sitting at his desk"?Yes. (Of course no one will hear the comma when you say it.)

Thank you very much CalifJim.

By the way, I'm not really sure whether the sentence is grammatical if "sitting at his desk" is referring to "him".

So, I just uploaded a question to do with this.

https://www.englishforums.com/English/PronounIng/bxqgvn/post.htm

I've already asked some native speakers, but am still not sure about this coz their answers are in disagreement.

I hope you will answer it.

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fire1whether the sentence is grammatical if "sitting at his desk" is referring to "him".

No good writer would write that sentence expecting the reader to think that "I", the speaker, am sitting at his desk, so yes, "he" is sitting at "his (own)" desk.

CJ