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Hello

Look at these two sentences:

Which one is correct? why?

- If you face troubles, call me.

- If you faced troubles, call me.

Thanks
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Comments  
Onh1986
Hello

Look at these two sentences:

Which one is correct? why?

- If you face troubles, call me.

- If you faced troubles, call me.

Thanks

If you face run into troubles, call me.

If you get lost coming to my house, give me a call.

If you don't like Japanese, we can go Italian tonight

These conditions indicate a lliklihood to happen.
Goodman- If you face run into troubles, call me.

Why is "face" wrong?

Because face means "to meet or confront somebody or something directly".
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In the context you provided, it's not quite idiomatic. You can use face in the following contexts::

Face the consequences, Face the truth, Face the reality etc...But face the trouble..umm. not quite in my opinion.
What about:

- I faced problems.

Is it wrong too?

What does "run into" mean?

Thanks
If you face run into troubles, call me.
If I'm not wrong it should be '... run into trouble...'
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Goodman
Onh1986Hello

Look at these two sentences:

Which one is correct? why?

- If you face troubles, call me.

- If you faced troubles, call me.

Thanks
If you face run into troubles, call me.
I think it should be "If you encounter trouble, call me."

What about:

- I faced problems.

Is it wrong too?

What does "run into" mean?

Thanks
Onh1986Hello

Look at these two sentences:

Which one is correct? why?

- If you face troubles, call me.

- If you faced troubles, call me.

Thanks
Hi Ohn

I'd say these would be pretty typical:

1) If you are facing trouble, call me. / If you find yourself facing any trouble, call me.

2) If you were ever facing trouble, you should just call me.

3) When you are ready to face your troubles, call me.

In the first sentence, the speaker might be offering unconditional assistance (call me) if the other person ever finds himself confronted with a problem.

The second sentence is similar to the first pair, but the speaker sees the potential for "trouble" as much more theoretical.

In the third sentence, the speaker feels that the other person is denying he has any problems, and the speaker is willing to help only after the other person finally admits and decides to deal with his problems.
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