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At the party last night I flirted with a woman named Sharon which I can understand you say you've dated a few years ago. Is that right?

(The speaker has the information from a third party who is not Sharon)

Is which I can understand correct and natural?

Would from which I can understand also be correct?

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This whole text confuses me. I can't figure out who is speaking or to whom they are speaking.

At the party last night I flirted with a woman named Sharon which I can understand you say you've dated a few years ago. This sentence doesn't make sense. It seems to be missing some punctuation.


You can't refer to a woman as 'which'.


(The speaker has the information from a third party who is not Sharon) I don't understand this.

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anonymousIs which I can understand correct and natural?

No. Not in that sentence.

anonymousWould from which I can understand also be correct?

That's way too twisted.

anonymousAt the party last night I flirted with a woman named Sharon which I can understand you say you've dated a few years ago. Is that right?

Let's simplify this:

At the party last night I flirted with a woman named Sharon. I understand you dated her a few years ago. Is that right?

Much better now.

CJ

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Comments  

The speaker has heard from a friend that a mutual friend of theirs has been dating Sharon a few years ago, though the friend wasn't convinced that he was telling the truth. The speaker asks the mutual friend if it's correct.

Not sure the context is important for the question, though. Maybe I have just confused you.

Comma after 'Sharon'.

Does the sentence make sense now? With 'who I can understand'?

anonymousIs which I can understand correct and natural?

No. You mean "which, I understand, you say …." This means that you were told that he said it. The commas are not optional.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.