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Which is correct?

1) Whatever the temperature is, I’ll go out.

2) Whatever is the temperature, I’ll go out.

Comments  
teacherJapanWhich is correct?

They both are, in a way.

teacherJapan1) Whatever the temperature is, I’ll go out.

This is usual.

teacherJapan2) Whatever is the temperature, I’ll go out.

This is permitted, but it is poetical and not for ordinary writing or everyday speech.

Oh, they are both okay. But I’ll just stick to the common one. Thank you very much, anonymous.
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You can also have

Whatever the temperature, I'll go out.

The versions with 'whatever' sound more high-register to me than those with 'no matter what'. In ordinary conversation I'd be more likely to say

I'll go out no matter what the temperature is.

CJ

CalifJimWhatever the temperature, I'll go out.

There are two determinatives in the NP "Whatever the temperature": Whatever and the.

In my opinion, Whatever functions as a determiner and the as modifier in that NP.

Am I correct?

anonymousIn my opinion, Whatever functions as a determiner and the as modifier in that NP. Am I correct?

I don't think so. I've never heard 'the' called a modifier.

I haven't seen anyone analyze that particular combination, so I don't know how the modern grammarians explain it.

CJ

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CalifJim
anonymousIn my opinion, Whatever functions as a determiner and the as modifier in that NP. Am I correct?

I don't think so. I've never heard 'the' called a modifier.

I haven't seen anyone analyze that particular combination, so I don't know how the modern grammarians explain it.

CJ

I see it this way:

Whatever temperature, I'll go out seems to be OK.

The temperature, I'll go out doesn't seem to be OK.

So, I see "the" as an adjunct in the clause, a modifier.

Is my analysis correct?

anonymous
CalifJim
anonymousIn my opinion, Whatever functions as a determiner and the as modifier in that NP. Am I correct?

I don't think so. I've never heard 'the' called a modifier.

I haven't seen anyone analyze that particular combination, so I don't know how the modern grammarians explain it.

CJ

I see it this way:

Whatever temperature, I'll go out seems to be OK.
Not really OK.

The temperature, I'll go out doesn't seem to be OK.
Right. It's not OK.

So, I see "the" as an adjunct in the clause, a modifier.

Is my analysis correct?

No. The logic seems faulty to me.

Modifiers are words like 'high' or 'low' when speaking of temperature.

CJ