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Hi Tutor,

I've 3 questions to ask.
Which sentence below are with the right grammar ?

Should i put seen or see from below sentence?
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Question 1
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1) Haven't you seen
OR
2) Haven't you see

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Question 2
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1)I’ve finished what Steve asked me to do.

2)I've finished what Steve had asked me to do.

3)I've finished what Steve has asked me to do.
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Question 3
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1)She was in London to accept an award for her latest novel.
2)She was in London to accept an award on her latest novel.

Could you guys please explain on the usage of grammar above?

Thank you so much friends,
Vincent
Comments  
1. haven't you seen ... [auxiliary "have" takes the past participle]

2. I've finished what Steve (has) asked me to do. (Either with or without "has" is OK.)

3. ... to accept an award for ... (With concepts of exchange, it's one thing for another.)

CJ
Hi CalifJim,

Thank you so much for your answers.

vincent
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Hi,

I've another 2 questions to ask. Thanks for your previous help.

Question:

What's the difference between:
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Question 1
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1) look forward to working with you
AND
2) look forward to work with you

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Question 2
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1) I was suprised that ...
OR
2) I was suprise that ...

Thanks to this forum. You guys are really really helpful.

Regards,
Vincent
... look forward to working ...
... was surprised that ...

The others are wrong.
Could we have a time context for this?

I've finished (today Friday) what Steve had asked me to do (to finish on Monday)
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(today's Friday)
"I've finished what Steve had asked me to do for Monday; the week-end's mine!"
Dear CalifJim,

It is strange to me that this is possible: "I've finished what Steve has asked me to do". The task is complete: the request is not. I have learned something new. Emotion: smile

Kind regards,
Goldmund
Goldmund,

In what sense do you interpret it to mean that the request is not complete?
I didn't really understand that remark.

If Steve has asked me to do something, I would assume that his request (his asking) is complete. To say it's not complete suggests to me that he is in mid-sentence of his request at the time the sentence is uttered.

Just curious.

Jim
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