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1. Last year, I started to work as a driver.

2. SInce last year, I have started to work as a driver.

3. Other?

I am still working as a driver now. The key is to tell the time.

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kenny19991. Last year, I started to work as a driver.

Fine. (The comma is not necessary.)

kenny19992. Since last year, I have started to work as a driver.

Also fine, but not better than the first one.

kenny1999I am still working as a driver now. The key is to tell the time. get the time relationships right in those sentences.

Both of them are OK with the time relationships. With the first one it would be easy to contradict the fact that you are still a driver now by adding "but I quit after six months". With the second one that's not so easy because you might have just started working as a driver four to six weeks ago, and it doesn't seem realistic that you've already quit.

In short, as they stand, with no further context, neither sentence says that you're not still working as a driver. Both imply that you are still a driver now.

CJ

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Why "tell the time" isn't correct?

kenny1999

Why "tell the time" isn't correct?

It refers to the ability to say what time it is when you look at a clock.

We teach children "to tell time" or "to tell the time" when we explain the big hand and the little hand of a clock, and so on. At a certain age, most children have learned to tell the time. They can correctly say "Two thirty" or "Half past six" when they look at a clock.

That has nothing to do with time as it is expressed through verb tenses.

CJ