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Could you tell me please, which one of the following pairs of sentences is in use nowadays?:

Which one is better? Is this “that” in use nowadays?

1.- I give you the pen that you may write the letter now.

2.- I give you the pen so that you may write the letter now.

Which one is better? Is this “lest” in use nowadays?

3.- I didn’t give her any money lest she should lose it.

4.- I didn’t give her any money so that she should not lose it.

Which one is better?

5.- Our decision is that the school remain closed.

6.- Our decision is that the school remains closed?

7.- It is important that he not stay there.

8.- It is important that he be there. Is it not better to say or write: It’s important that he should be there, or: It’s important that he is there?

Which one is better?

9.- It’s necessary that he don’t be late home tomorrow.

10.- It’s necessary that he doesn’t be late home tomorrow?

Thank you in advance

Eladio
Comments  
All are in use (though most are formed quite formally, subjunctive or not), except for these, which I have fixed:

9.- It’s necessary that he not be late coming/arriving home tomorrow.
10.- It’s necessary that he isn't late coming/arriving home tomorrow.
1-4 all sound VERY old fashioned. A more natural way of saying them would be:

Here is a pen so you can write the letter now.

I didn't give her the money because I didn't want her to lose it.

I don't know anyone who uses "lest" -- although it would be understood.
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I don't know anyone who uses "lest"
Lest we forget... I still do. (Creak... creak. argh-- this cold spell is shore gettin' to my joints...)
(deleted: duplicate-- MM)
I'll send you some Ben-Gay, there, Mr. M. I better do it now, lest I forget later.

(You really, truly say that conversationally? The only time I'd ever say it is in relation to fallen members of the militay, or other great sacrifices of the past - it has a "past" feeling to it.)
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To be honest, GG, I don't have conversations with anyone any more. I agree that the word is aging-- as are many others in this illiterate modern age. How about we let Ms Google moderate?--

25,800,000 English pages for "lest "

Somebody's sure using it these days.
Golly, somebody sure is. They seem to mostly be related to "lest we forget" - the Holocaust and people killed in action - which is the feeling I get from it too. Remembrance.

But I do wonder if anyone says things like "I'll put that book you wanted to borrow in the car now, lest I forget later when I leave" or "Make sure you take your umbrella lest it should rain."