Hi teachers.

I found this sentence in a book?

Who is in New York with him?

Isn't it better to say, 'Who is with him in New York?'

Are both correct?

I have always follow this rule, 'Subject + Verb + Object + Place'

Is it wrong?

Thanks in advance
1 2
Both are correct.
Hi CSnyder,

Thanks a lot for your reply. So I don't always have to follow the rule, right?

Thinking
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You do not always have to follow that rule.

One thing you might take into account is how the placement of the different parts of the question can subtly change the meaning.

For example, let's compare

"Who is in New York with him?" to "Who is with him in New York?"

The first formulation emphasizes the fact that he (whoever he is) is in New York more than the identity of the people who are there with him.

The second formulation emphasizes the identity of the people with him more than it does their presence in New York.

Hopefully that's comprehensible. There must be a better way to phrase the distinction, but obviously I'm not having an easy time coming up with one.
Emotion: smile Hi CSnyder,

It's a great explanation.

I have understood it very well.

Thinking
Thinking SpainI have always follow this rule, 'Subject + Verb + Object + Place'
Is it wrong?
The rule is correct, but your sentence doesn't have an object, so there is no way to apply this rule! Emotion: smile

You simply have two prepositional phrases, and a 'with' phrase is usually not too fussy about where you put it. Emotion: smile

CJ
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Hi CalifJim,
CalifJimYou simply have two prepositional phrases
Thank you. So, the prepositional phrases are: 'in New York' and 'with him'.

CalifJimThe rule is correct, but your sentence doesn't have an object, so there is no way to apply this rule!
Uphs! I thought 'with him' was the object, because there is an object pronoun 'him'.

In this sentence, 'He is driving her to the beach'. there is a subject pronoun 'he' and an object pronoun 'her'. Is it because 'is driving' is an action verb, and in the sentence, 'Who is with him in New York'? there's 'be' a non-action verb?

So, because there is no object in the sentence the 'with' phrase can be before or after the 'in' phrase.

That is what I have understood. By the way I didn't know about the word 'fussy'. Now I do. Thank you very much.Emotion: wink

Thinking
Thinking SpainI thought 'with him' was the object, because there is an object pronoun 'him'.
No. You have to distinguish between "object of a verb" and "object of a preposition" (with him). Your little rule applies to "object of a verb".

Thinking SpainSo, because there is no object in the sentence the 'with' phrase can be before or after the 'in' phrase.
This is basically correct. In English we don't like to put anything between the verb and its object. We don't "bang loudly the drum". We "bang the drum loudly"!

Thinking SpainI didn't know about the word 'fussy'. Now I do.
Good! You have to know that word! It's a good one.

CJ
Hi CalifJim,

Thanks a lot for your explanation. I've learned with it!

So, basically the object of the preposition is the noun or pronoun that comes after the preposition and it will often have modifiers that add description.

Examples: She put the pens in the box. 'Box' is the object of the preposition.

After his exams Robert will go on vacations. 'Exams' is the object of the preposition.

So, it has nothing to do with 'action' or 'non-action verbs', does it?

CalifJim
Thinking SpainI didn't know about the word 'fussy'. Now I do.
Good! You have to know that word! It's a good one.
It certainly is. I can apply this one to a few people.Emotion: wink

Thinking
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