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Ask me what can I do for you


Or Ask me what I can do for you?

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Ask me what can I do for you. (This is an imperative sentence. It is not interrogative.)

Ask me, "What can I do for you?" (This is an interrogative sentence as a direct quotation within an imperative.

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user3959Ask me what I can do for you.
What can you do for me?
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As they stand, the second one is right. Toss in some punctuation, and the picture changes:

"Ask me, 'What can I do for you?'" You are telling me to ask you that question in those very words.

 Persian Learner's reply was promoted to an answer.
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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AlpheccaStarsAsk me what can I do for you.
AlpheccaStarsThis is an imperative sentence. It is not interrogative
But the ensuing clause is interrogative.
alpeccastars if that's imperative so shouldn't it be ask me what I can do for you not what can I do for you
user3959 so shouldn't it be ask me what I can do for you not what can I do for you

Yes, the inversion changes between the declarative with indirect question and the interrogative.

Ask me what I can do for you. (imperative with indirect question)
Ask me, "What can I do for you?" (imperative with direct question.)

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