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Which sentence is correct in each example below?
1.Being sure that i had passed the driving test, i began to enjoy the driving. OR Sure

that i had passed, i began to enjoy the driving.
2.Being surprised and happy, Tony stood up and accepted the prize. OR Surprised and

happy, Tony stood up and accepted the prize.
3.Being tired of doing the same thing,the man quitted his job. OR Tired of doing the

same thing,the man quitted his job.
4.Being lost in the mountains for a week, the 2 students were finally saved. OR Lost in

the mountains for a week, the 2 students were finally saved.

It is said that in some cases you can omit the word 'Being' and sometimes it is wrong

to add the 'Being',is it right?If it is,how to choose?
Comments  
1. Sure that I had passed, I began to enjoy the driving.
2. Surprised and happy, Tony stood up and accepted the prize.
3. Tired of doing the same thing, the man quit his job.
4. Lost in the mountains for a week, the two students were finally saved.

It is said that in some cases you can omit the word 'Being' and sometimes it is wrong to add the 'Being',is it right? If it is,how to choose?-- I think that 'being' should be omitted 99% of the time. (Sorry, but the case of the remaining 1% does not occur to me offhand.)
Hi Mister Micawber,

How about these two sentence:1.Being anxious to please him,I bought him a nice present.2.So many people being absent,We decided to put the meeting off.

Should the 'being' be omitted?

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In one it's better; in the other it's not:

1. Eager to please him, I bought him a nice present.

2. So many people being absent, we decided to put the meeting off.
It's very kind of you to reply so quickly.Thank you so much!

In the second example,why the 'being' shouldn't be omitted?

Here are two more examples:3.Being ill, he didn't go to school.4.Being nervous,he stood there saying nothing.I suppose that the 'being' shouldn't be omitted too,am I right?So are there any rules about it?
In the second example,why the 'being' shouldn't be omitted?-- It can be; the phrase just sounds a little terse to me without it.

3.Being ill, he didn't go to school.

4.Being nervous, he stood there saying nothing.

I suppose that the 'being' shouldn't be omitted too,am I right? -- I would keep them, yes, but they could be omitted.

So are there any rules about it?-- You asked this before, and I said none occurred to me. The adjective just sounds a little too brief sometimes. Maybe someone else has a linguistic answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Ok.Hope someone else can give a linguistic answer.Anyway,thank you for your patience to answer my question.

Best regards!

Bill