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The receptionist, who was away last week

The receptionist returning to work today

The receptionist returns today.

The receptionist, who was away last week and returns to work.

which is correct and what type of sentence is it
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Comments  (Page 6) 
Hello Roro

The story about Giotto and the freehand circle comes from Vasari's Life:
After this he was called to Assisi by Fra Giovanni di Muro, at that time general of the order of S. Francis, and painted in fresco in the upper church thirty-two stories from the life and deeds of S. Francis, which brought him great fame. It is no wonder therefore that Pope Benedict sent one of his courtiers into Tuscany to see what sort of a man he was and what his works were like, for the Pope was planning to have some paintings made in S. Peter’s. This courtier, on his way to see Giotto and to find out what other masters of painting and mosaic there were in Florence, spoke with many masters in Sienna, and then, having received some drawings from them, he came to Florence. And one morning going into the workshop of Giotto, who was at his labours, he showed him the mind of the Pope, and at last asked him to give him a little drawing to send to his Holiness. Giotto, who was a man of courteous manners, immediately took a sheet of paper, and with a pen dipped in red, fixing his arm firmly against his side to make a compass of it, with a turn of his hand he made a circle so perfect that it was a marvel to see it. Having done it, he turned smiling to the courtier and said, “Here is the drawing.” But he, thinking he was being laughed at, asked, “Am I to have no other drawing than this?” “This is enough and too much,” replied Giotto, “send it with the others and see if it will be understood.” The messenger, seeing that he could get nothing else, departed ill pleased, not doubting that he had been made a fool of. However, sending the other drawings to the Pope with the names of those who had made them, he sent also Giotto’s, relating how he had made the circle without moving his arm and without compasses, which when the Pope and many of his courtiers understood, they saw that Giotto must surpass greatly all the other painters of his time. This thing being told, there arose from it a proverb which is still used about men of coarse clay, “You are rounder than the O of Giotto,” which proverb is not only good because of the occasion from which it sprang, but also still more for its significance which consists in its ambiguity, tondo, “round,” meaning in Tuscany not only a perfect circle, but also slowness and heaviness of mind.
Will resume later, when I next log on!

MrP
... you're in peak form, aren't you ... this is what Leibniz, Frege & Wittgenstein were eager after ..? .. maybe...!
Thank you for your correctum, yes, it should be read so, I missed that point.

The only problem is, we can truly utter the sentence 2, 'I was drawing a circle,' even when there doesn't exist any point at all. Yes, we can.

OK. I got interested. Let me try to explain what I've learn about the difference between {entity} and {imaginary (set of) properties}. Somewhere later.

Catch you later,

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... you're in peak form, aren't you ... this is what Leibniz, Frege & Wittgenstein were eager after ..? .. maybe...!
Thank you for your correctum, yes, it should be read so, I missed that point.

The only problem is, we can truly utter the sentence 2, 'I was drawing a circle,' even when there doesn't exist any point at all. Yes, we can.

OK. I got interested. Let me try to explain what I've learned about the difference between {entity} and {imaginary (set of) properties}. Somewhere later.

Catch you later,



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Dear Mr/Mrs Moderator, I made a double post. Please delete the latter 'anonymous' one. I'm sorry for taking your time, trouble.
Hello MrPedantic!
I like your story, both legend (it's certainly legendarous, ..coinage? Does it work?) and proverb,

〖 about men of coarse clay 〗“You are rounder than the O of Giotto”

Nice pun..!!

Especially I like the phrase of Giotto,〖 This is enough and too much 〗. ha-ha... I like it.

There's more to the story? I'm looking forward to hearing it from you. I'm sure: Davkett, too, will enjoy your story!
There seems to be one more problem, MrP.
Suppose your interpretation express properly the meaning/the truth condition of [#2]:

[#2] I was drawing a circle.
⇒ There is an entity of which, at the moment referred to in #2, I had drawn more than nothing and less than all, such that a point might have been found whose distance from any spot on the line that I had drawn before the moment referred to in #2 was equivalent to its distance from any other spot on that line.
┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈┈
Then we cannot distinguish the meanings between , , and .

In addition, if my comment 'we can truly utter the sentence #2 even when there doesn't exist any point at all' is right, the sentences and may have the same (extensional) meaning ... at the very least in the traditional predicate logic ..., so, something is still wrong..!

(I hope this comment wouldn't dissapoint you so much. I hope I understood your top-quality-wit properly. Your interpretation deprived me of my power to argue against, so to speak. At first.
I added some objection only because your interpretation is a very good point.)
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MrP,

Thanks for the reminder of where the story of Giotto-and-the-circle is found.

Should this thread be moved over into Linguistics Discussion Forum?
Hello davkett,
Talking about a circle...
I guess you know about it already, but I'd like to refer you to this 'Villarceau Circle' site, simply because I like it! Kid stuff..

http://www1.ttcn.ne.jp/~a-nishi/torus/z_villarceau.html

Hello MrPedantic,
Thank you for your quote from Vasari. I haven't read him yet.
Seems I misunderstood your comment absent-mindedly.

As to my questions, they are getting badly ordered, I know. And I'm still not sure how to put my question, how to put my opinion about the 'truth condition' of the sentence .
I'm not in a hurry, please don't worry.

Hmm...Let me try again:

"2. At a particular past moment, there were two entities: A, my notion of a figure such that the distance from its centre to any point on its boundary was equivalent to the distance from the centre to any other point on its boundary; and B, my incomplete version in pencil of A."

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I'm not quite sure we can say <I was drawing a circle> if we haven't yet put pencil to paper. We might say <I was about to draw a circle>.

"MrP! What on earth are you doing?"

"Isn't it obvious? I'm drawing a circle, à la Giotto!"

"A circle? But...where is it? I see only blank paper."

"I already have my arm fixed against my side, like the leg of a pair of compasses. I have my pencil in my hand. I have the notion of my circle in my mind. I'd say it's more or less done."

Hmm. Will have to reconsider...

MrP
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Hello MrPedantic,
Seems it's a bit hard to refute you this time. ... you're on the right track (if it's not too pert for me to say so)..!
Of course there're still a lot of technical troublesome red-tapisms we have to get through, though, to express [my notion of a figure].

As to the second part of your post, I don't have some strong argument, but let me think...

Thank you for your reply, good night.
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