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The receptionist, who was away last week

The receptionist returning to work today

The receptionist returns today.

The receptionist, who was away last week and returns to work.

which is correct and what type of sentence is it
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Comments  (Page 7) 
...a lot of technical troublesome red-tapisms...
Emotion: smile

It's a very long journey from A to A.

I'll see if I can do something about the notion...I've a notion we can do without it, maybe...

MrP
??
...oh please don't be too rhetorical!
I don't know at all what kind of assiciation worked, but it reminds me of this passage:

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  Yorick listened to my father with great attention ; there was a seasoning of wisdom unaccountably mixed up with his strangest whims, and he had sometimes such illuminations in the darkest of his eclipses, as almost attoned for them : -- be wary, Sir, when you imitate him. (5-XLII)

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{Quote=MrP} 
I'll see if I can do something about the notion...I've a notion we can do without it, maybe...
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It would be interesting. If you have some idea, please ignore what follows. It would certainly more interesting. I have no idea how to treat/do without notions, though.

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{Quote=MrP} I'm not quite sure we can say 'I was drawing a circle' if we haven't yet put pencil to paper. We might say 'I was about to draw a circle'.
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"MrP! What on earth are you doing?"
"Isn't it obvious? I'm drawing a circle, à la Giotto!"
"A circle? But...where is it? I see only blank paper."
"I already have my arm fixed against my side, like the leg of a pair of compasses. I have my pencil in my hand. I have the notion of my circle in my mind. I'd say it's more or less done."
⇒ Therefore I insist I'm drawing a circle. 〖not so bad! no?〗
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The verb 'draw', indeed, requires physical act/effect, probably, so I think you may be right.
〖We might say 'I was about to draw a circle'〗
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But we can say:
"MrP! What on earth are you doing? You've been sitting, gazing into nowhere, without doing anything. What's up? "
"Isn't it obvious? I'm composing a symphony, à la Williams!"

[Traditional predicate logic is extensional, thus expressions with the same reference (=extension) may be freely substituted for each other. In this particular case MrP is doing nothing, {a symphony à la Williams}'s extension is empty, ∅. Thus this expression can be substituted for any other expression which has ∅ as its extension, e.g. {a violin concerto à la Mozart} or {a brand-new theory about Conditionals}.]
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I'd like to explain what I've learned -- at least I'll try later, if yo don't mind -- by distinguishing the truth conditions of the following pair:

[1] John is looking for a unicorn.
[2] John is looking for a centaur.

See you later,
"MrP! What on earth are you doing? You've been sitting, gazing into nowhere, without doing anything. What's up? "
"Isn't it obvious? I'm composing a symphony, à la Williams!"
I would believe him! Symphonies can be written first in the head...whereas circles –

But one moment.

If Giotto were an adherent of an eastern religion? Perhaps Taoist? Then:

"MrG! What on earth are you doing? You've been sitting, gazing into nowhere, without doing anything. What's up? "

"Isn't it obvious? I'm drawing a circle."

"Drawing a circle? But where is your pen, your paper?"

"Ah! But this is to be a perfect circle! And drawing a perfect circle requires many years' preparation. Now leave me. I have 357 degrees still to compose."

[Years passed. Giotto gathered dust. Little by little, the good people of the town forgot his paintings, his sayings; even his name. Then one day – ]

Giotto opened his eyes. He took a piece of charcoal in his right hand. He strode over to the whitewashed wall. With one swift sweep of the charcoal, he drew – a perfect circle.

Then fell, stone dead.

MrP
Next morning village people found him with a blissful smile set upon his face. They realised then he was truly divine. Giotto's paintings got rediscovered, and he has been remembered down through the ages. Now every infant, every kindergaeten child in Italy knows his name.

It reminds me of the end of 'The Moon and Sixpence' a bit.

I really appreciate your imagination!
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MrP,

There is a film with a segment showing Henri Matisse, standing before a fresh empty canvas on the easel, looking at a young boy sitting for his portrait. The film shows Matisse, with charcoal in hand, gazing at the boy, then making a little wave in the air, then touching the charcoal to canvas and drawing the profile of the boy's head. The shot is then replayed in slow motion, and it appears that in the act of gesturing in the air with his hand, Matisse was actually tracing out the shape of the boy's head before touching the tool to the canvas. 'Drawing' the image began before the charcoal touched the surface.

I like to think about drawing, in part, the same way we think about drawing water from a well. And where, or what, is that well? The mind?

This, called up by your version of the story of Giotto and the circle.
Hello davkett, MrPedantic,
Sorry for my slow reply. It's not because I forgot my promise (which I made somewhere above), ... simply I don't like to feel being rushed.
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'Drawing' an image from a well. Henri Matisse. Interesting!
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While browsing 'The Notebook of Leonardo Da Vinci' I found such a passage; it reminds me of your story, davkett.
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 I have found in my own experience that it is of no small benefit when you lie in bed in the dark to go over again in the imagination the outlines of the forms you have been studying or of other noteworthy things conceived by subtle speculation.
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Painters may be entitled to say 'I'm drawing a circle,' lying in the dark.

See you later,
I enjoy your thought process, Roro.

Everyone knows that Mozart's music was finished in his head. It must have been such a mundane act for him to write it all down...except for the apparent fun he must have had in writing jokes, in the margins, for the performers.

For myself, except for universally known forms, I cannot-- in the mode of DaVinci or Mozart--, preconceive, or prefigure any of the images that end up in my own artworks. There is another side to the ''coin': no mind-image, no pre-deliberation, only procedure with tool-in-hand.

I suppose it may be shown, as in legal cases involving 'pre-meditation', that if there is willful intent a split-second before the act, the crime is punishable as pre-meditated. So, 'proceeding with tool-in-hand' does not necessarily prove that an act hasn't been preceded by an image in the mind.

Still, that 'split-second' process is of a very different order than Mozart's.
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Thank you for your kind words, davkett!
I really enjoy your insights which stimulate curiosity.
('such a mundane act' ... ha-ha, yes, it must have been so for him!)

I've read somewhere how difficult to define the difference between 'willfulness' and 'recklessness,' purely verbally.

In reality ┈ in practice ┈ the distinction depends on your 'acting ability (acting skills as a performer)', some authority says.

Let me wish you the best of luck in your work!
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