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Yesterday, I went to see my aunt in Charsada which/that is in Khyber Pakhtoonkha.

I think 'which' is the correct option.

Am I right?

Thanks.

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sundarnazI think 'which' is the correct option. Am I right?

Maybe.

Suppose there are three places named Charsada. One is in Balochistan, another in Punjab, and the third in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Then the relative clause is required to distinguish which Charsada your aunt lives in. It is a defining relative clause. So "that" is used.

If there is only one of these places, then the relative clause can be deleted with no damage to the message or communication. "Which" is used for non-defining (non-essential ) relative clauses.


https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/relative-clauses-defining-and-non-defining

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Here's my opinion on the sentence:

Yesterday, I went to see my aunt in Charsada, which is in Khyber Pakhtoonkha.

Better:

Yesterday, I went to see my aunt in Charsada in Khyber Pakhtoonkha.

Even better:

Yesterday, I went to see my aunt in Charsada, Khyber Pakhtoonkha.

CJ

There are 35 places in America called 'Lincoln'. We specify them by the state they're in thus:

Lincoln, California; Lincoln, Nebraska; Lincoln, Colorado; Lincoln, Texas; etc.

All you need is a comma. Emotion: smile

CJ