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'The only game which I play are pingpong.'
or
'The only game that I play are pingpong.'
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Comments  
I think you can use both.
By the way, don't you have use "is" instead of "are"?
or is it correct grammatically with "are"?
I think it's different from "I were/was".
Hello

I'm afraid it would be a prescriptive rule but I was taught in school as follows:

Choose "that" rather than "which"
in the case the antecedent is modified by
"all", "every", "any", "no", "the only", "the same", "the very"
or any adjective in superlative form (the ....est or the most .....).

So if you have to choose only one, what I'd like to recommend is;
'The only game that I play is pingpong.'

paco
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so sorry!
It's 'is' instead of 'are'.A WRONG TYPING.
What I've been told is that "that" is the form preferred by purists to introduce restrictive relative clauses (which is the case here). Not that "which" is wrong but some examiners could make a point of it.
Miche, I have heard the same thing. I believe you are absolutely right on this point. CJ
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What I've been told is that "that" is the form preferred by purists to introduce restrictive relative clauses (which is the case here). Not that "which" is wrong but some examiners could make a point of it.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Miche,

ESL students should not have to put up with examiners or teachers who propagate falsehoods about language. If an examiner were to do such a thing, ask for, better yet, demand proof.

No knowledgeable language source supports this old canard, nor is there support for it to be found in the English language. This is just one more old prescription.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Writing/t.html

That versus Which.
According to the more quibbling self-styled grammar experts, that is restrictive, while which is not.
Many grammarians insist on a distinction without any historical justification. Many of the best writers in the language couldn't tell you the difference between them, while many of the worst [purists] think they know. If the subtle difference between the two confuses you, use whatever sounds right.

{the addition in brackets is mine, not Prof Lynch's}

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Great advice but following this, above, Professor Lynch gets his reasoning wrong. It isn't that there aren't such things as restrictives and nonrestrictives. Both that & which can be used for the former but when something becomes a nonrestrictive, then only can be used.

Same idea for ; both are possible as restrictives but only can be used as a nonrestrictive.
demand proof


Can you suggest what form such a proof would take?
CJ: Can you suggest what form such a proof would take?

JTT: I think "any" would be a good start, Jim.
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