Hi teacher,

Based on the answer, which part of speech is 'does'? Is it an auxiliary verb?

How often does Julia get to the office late?

She often does it.

Thanks in advance
1 2
<<Based on the answer, which part of speech is 'does'? Is it an auxiliary verb?>>

Yes, but it should be simply "She often does" or just "Often" or "Very often".

I don't sense that there's any real activity that she does that can be represented by "it", though, strange to say, I might accept "that" in its place: She often does that.

CJ
You're probably thinking this because in the question "does" is an auxiliary verb, in an interrogative construction. However, in the answer "does" is a regular verb (transitive). But the answer is more idiomatic than anything else - instead of giving the number of times she is late, as requested, you blurt out an idiomatic type of expression that emphasizes the frequency of her lateness. You see the verb "do" used in this manner in many expressions:

Just do it.

She does it all the time.

Do it!

I'm gonna do it.

You do that and you'll regret it.

Don't do that!

I tell her not to but she keeps on doing it.
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Hi Jim,

Thank you so much for your reply and comentaries.

Best,

TS

Hi Anonymous.

Thank so much for your reply, explanations, and examples given.

So for you it isn't an auxiliary verb, but a transitive one. If I'm not mistaken, a transitive verb is a verb that requires both a direct subject and one or more objects.

The answer 'She often does.' doesn't have an object. Could you help me understand it please?


TS

The auxiliary 'does' stands for 'does get'. You can always answer a question with an auxiliary (or modal) by using just the auxiliary (or the modal) and it means the same as if you added the original verb (and the rest of the sentence).

- Can you help?

- I can. (I can help.)

- Is he meeting you tonight?

- He is. (He is meeting me tonight.)

So it's not a matter of whether 'does' is transitive; it isn't either transitive or intransitive. It depends on the verb that 'does' goes with. In this case the main verb is 'get' and it's used intransitively. So in this sentence you can say 'get' is intransitive, so 'does get' is intransitive too.

CJ
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Hi Jim,

Thank you for your reply and explanations.

The auxiliary 'does' stands for 'does get'. You can always answer a question with an auxiliary (or modal) by using just the auxiliary (or the modal)

I know we can do it with yes/no questions, but can I also answer all wh-questions with 'does' or 'do'?

I only know for sure this one, when you ask about the subject:

Who drives Frank to work?

Sara drives him to work.

Sara does.

Sara.

TS
I know we can do it with yes/no questions, but can I also answer all wh-questions with 'does' or 'do'?

No. You can't answer them all with 'does' or 'do'!

What if the question is in the past tense? Then you need to answer with 'did'.

Who drove him to work?

Sara did. (No 'does' or 'do'.)

What if the question has a different auxiliary or modal? Then you need to answer with that.

Who can drive him to work?

Sara can. (No 'does' or 'do'.)

Who has been seen at the mall this week?

Sara has. (No 'does' or 'do'.)

Who is making that noise?

Sara is. (No 'does' or 'do'.)

______________________________

Cases where the element questioned is not the subject don't work the same way.

Who did Sara drive to work?

She drove Frank to work.

Frank.

What would Sara buy?

She would buy a new coat.

A new coat.

CJ
Hi Jim,

Emotion: embarrassed So sorry, I have expressed myself really badly. Why? Because I know all the examples you have given me and the rules. So, it's my fault. What I meant was about the example given. Here we're not questioning about the subject, but the frequency in which the subject does something. How come we can use the verb'does' in the answer then? Though it sounds very natural to me, I don't know the reason.

How often does Julia get to the office late?

She often does.

Thanks

TS
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