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Hi teachers,
There's a picture with this sentence, 'Door attendant holding door for business man leaving hotel.'
Is it 'holding' a gerund? If yes, is it acting as a noun? If not, what is it?

Thanks in advance
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Comments  
No it is the head of the non-finite participial clause ('holding door...leaving hotel'); the clause is modifying 'door attendant'. Note also that 'leaving hotel' is the same structure but modifying 'businessman' (1 word).
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you so much for your reply.
Businessman, can't be a separated word?

It's the same with this one, isn't it?
Close-up of a person's hand holding a frying pan with a fried egg.

TS
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Businessman, can't be a separated word?-- Not these days, though it probably started that way.
It's the same with this one, isn't it?-- Yes
Hi Mister Micewber,
Thank you for your reply.
One last question please:
Will this one be correct too? Will it have the same meaning?
The door attendant is holding the door for a businessman who is leaving the hotel.

TS
Yes. However, when I was parsing the phrase, I was considering it this way:

A door attendant who is holding a door for a businessman who is leaving a hotel.
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Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for all your replies.
No further questions.

Best,
TS
Mister MicawberYes. However, when I was parsing the phrase, I was considering it this way:A door attendant who is holding a door for a businessman who is leaving a hotel.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for it.
Will it be wrong this way then?
The door attendant is holding the door for a businessman who is leaving the hotel.

TS
No, that is fine. It is another way to interpret the photo caption, which is, after all, only a fragment.
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