1."Teach your employee to not speak English correctly."

2."Teach your employee to not to speak English correctly."

I personally agree with the latter more, because I think it's more grammatically correct,

but I'm not sure because I hear lots of people saying sentences in the form of the former all the time.

Is there anybody who can clarify the question and explain a little?

Thank you for your help at it!
A little correction on sentence 2: Teach your employee not to speak English correctly. [You have an extra "to" before the not.]

Sentence 1 splits the infinitive (to speak) with the negative word "not" so it is grammatically incorrect. However, many people do use that format in common speech. A famous example in the US is the old TV show, Star Trek. It's introduction makes the statement, "To boldy go where no man has gone before." The word "boldly" separates the "to go." It's not grammatically correct, but it's often used casually.

In this situation of talking to a boss about his employees, the more formal, "Teacher your employee not to speak English correctly," would be the best to say. Although, I'm not sure sure why a boss would want to teach his employee NOT to speak English correctly. It seems to me he would WANT his employees to speak correctly. Emotion: smile

Chalk
chalkbrdA little correction on sentence 2: Teach your employee not to speak English correctly. [You have an extra "to" before the not.] Sentence 1 splits the infinitive (to speak) with the negative word "not" so it is grammatically incorrect. However, many people do use that format in common speech. A famous example in the US is the old TV show, Star Trek. It's introduction makes the statement, "To boldy go where no man has gone before." The word "boldly" separates the "to go." It's not grammatically correct, but it's often used casually. In this situation of talking to a boss about his employees, the more formal, "Teacher your employee not to speak English correctly," would be the best to say. Although, I'm not sure sure why a boss would want to teach his employee NOT to speak English correctly. It seems to me he would WANT his employees to speak correctly. Chalk
Of course that sentence was a little joke I heard from a comedy.

One more question out of your post here,

"To boldy go where no man has gone before" sounds a little incorrect to me in a different way,

I think it should be "To boldly go where no man has ever gone to before",

which will be all the more correct in my eye.

Am I right?
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chalkbrdA

Sentence 1 splits the infinitive (to speak) with the negative word "not" so it is grammatically incorrect.

I think that the prohibition against splitting infinitives has been largely discredited. Regardless of the above, 'not to verb' and 'to not verb' are two distinct grammatical forms and can both be correct, in the right situations.

1a) I did it not to make my coworker angry but to avoid making the boss angry.

1b) I did it to not make the boss angry.

A longer form of the sentence above is 'I did it in order to not make the boss angry.'

2a) My goal is to not be on the 6 a.m. flight. (It is very clear what your goal is. You want to avoid the 6 a.m. flight.)

2b) My goal is not to be on the 6 a.m. flight. (The meaning is not clear. Are you telling us what yout goal is or what your goal is not?)

My goal is not to be on the 6 a.m. flight. My goal is just to get there by 12 noon.

Chalk

c45

In this case we would leave out the "to" after the verb "gone." We often don't put the word "to" after the verb "go" and its forms unless we specify where we are going.

Common: Where are you going?

Uncommon: Where are you going to?

Very uncommon: To where are you going?

Common: To boldly go where no man has gone before.

Uncommon: To boldly go where no man has gone to before.

The saying, "To boldly go where no man has gone before" is very well-known. It is part of the American pop culture and it's the only way you would hear it said. It's too famous to say it differently. Emotion: smile

Oh, and when it comes to the split infinitive, there are still grammar-obsessed people who will insist it is the only way to say it. I think it can be said either way, but it depends on who you are talking to.

Chalk
Should it not be,

To go boldly where no man has gone to before?

Not that I would ever want to correct Captain Kirk.

Arshad
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