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1. They are not so lovers as friends.

2. They are not so much lovers as friends.

3. They are not so lovers.

4. They are not very lovers as friends.

5. They are not very much lovers as friends.

6. They are not very lovers.

7. We are so friends!

8. We are very friends!

9. We are so much friends!

10. We are very much friends!

11. This is so my brother!

12. This is very my brother!

13. This is so much my brother!

14. This is very much my brother!

This is a very long question, sorry, but I want to know which sentences are correct English and when I can use them correctly in a situation.

Please help me. I really want to know!

Thank you very much!

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fire1Which sentences are correct English?

2 is correct. It's one of the many sentences you can form with the pattern

not so much X as Y

See the link below for examples of how to use this pattern.

https://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?q=%22not+so+much%22+%22as%22&l=0


10 is correct but it's very casual English. It can be used to contradict a previous statement.

— ... but we aren't really very close friends.
— What do you mean? We are very much friends!

I don't recommend that you spend a lot of time thinking about this expression.


11 is also casual English. The more standard version is This is so like my brother.


The others are all impossible.

CJ

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

To CalifJim

Thank you very much CalifJim!

But what about 12?

I think 12 is correct as well because I have seen native speakers saying "This is very you!" to mean "This is so you!".

I think 12 is correct in this scenario below.

An example is:

X: He made a really bad joke

Y: Yeah I know, this is so my brother

fire1I think 12 is correct in this scenario below.An example is: X: He made a really bad jokeY: Yeah I know, this is so my brother

Number 12 is not "This is so my brother".

You need to get your story straight before you post. Emotion: smile

CJ

CalifJim
fire1I think 12 is correct in this scenario below.An example is: X: He made a really bad jokeY: Yeah I know, this is so my brother

Number 12 is not "This is so my brother".

You need to get your story straight before you post.

CJ

Ah, sorry. I'm asking whether 11 can be used in the situation, and I seem to have heard a native speaker saying "this is very you!" to mean "This is so you!", so I think 12 might be correct as well in a certain context.

On top of this, a native speaker just answered me that "we are so friends" is fine in this scenario below. I want to hear your opinion as to this as well. Thank you very much for your help.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
fire1a native speaker just answered me that "we are so friends" is fine in this scenario below. I want to hear your opinion.
fire1I seem to have heard a native speaker saying "this is very you!" to mean "This is so you!"

My opinion: Emotion: ick!

Emotion: big smile

Those are examples of teenager slang. There is nothing in these expressions that illustrates any general principal of English grammar that is useful to a learner of English. If you like to talk like that, you can memorize individual expressions and use them, but they are not productive in the linguistic sense, i.e., you can't apply the patterns generally to other situations.

In other words, there is no "This is so airplane" or "This is so people" or "This is so committee" or "This is so girlfriend" or "This is so house".

CJ

"We are so friends."

The usage I am critiquing above is the one that is parsed

We are [so friends].

"so" is an adverb of degree for "friends". It's says we are friends to a great degree.


The other parsing is OK.

We [are so] friends.

"so" goes with "are" here. This one says we certainly are friends (in contradiction of a statement that we are not friends).

CJ

CalifJim

The other parsing is OK.

We [are so] friends.

"so" goes with "are" here. This one says we certainly are friends (in contradiction of a statement that we are not friends).

CJ

I have never learnt "so" can be used to emphasize "are". Is that really possible?

If so, isn't it better to place "so" right before "are" so as to drop the possibility that readers think "so" seems to go with "friends"?

Like, "We so are friends!" as a contradictory statement to "We are not friends!".

There were no teachers who taught me about this usage "so", ever, when I attended school.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
fire1I have never learnt "so" can be used to emphasize "are". Is that really possible?

Yes. You learn something new every day!

"is so" and "are so" are used thus:

— It's MY turn to throw the ball.
— It is not.
— Is so.
— Is not.
— Is so.
...

— These aren't your glasses.
— They are so.
— Are not.
— Are so.
— Are not.
— Are so.
...

fire1If so, isn't it better to place "so" right before "are" so as to drop the possibility that readers think "so" seems to go with "friends"? Like, "We so are friends!" as a contradictory statement to "We are not friends!".

"So" before "are"? No. That's never going to happen.

— We are not friends.
— We are so friends.
— Are not.
— Are so.
...

fire1There were no teachers who taught me about this usage "so", ever, when I attended school.

Hmm. Well, now you know.

CJ