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Hi,
when we are forced to choose between two things which we wouldn't like to do, could we use both 'would prefer' and 'would rather' to convey the idea? E.g.

I'd rather pay the fine than go to prison.'
Or
I'd prefer paying the fine to going to prison.'
(Although I wouldn't like to pay the fine and go to prison, I have to choose either.)

If I have to choose between two things which I would like to do, could we also use 'would rather' or 'would prefer' to convey the idea? E.g.

'I would like to go by plane or train.' But I have to choose one of them, could I say
'I would rather go by train.'
Or
'I would prefer to go by train.'

Thanks.
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Hi,

when we are forced to choose between two things which we wouldn't like to do, could we use both 'would prefer' and 'would rather' to convey the idea? E.g.

I'd rather pay the fine than go to prison.'
Or
I'd prefer paying the fine to going to prison.'
(Although I wouldn't like to pay the fine and go to prison, I have to choose either.)


If I have to choose between two things which I would like to do, could we also use 'would rather' or 'would prefer' to convey the idea? E.g.

'I would like to go by plane or train.' But I have to choose one of them, could I say
'I would rather go by train.'
Or
'I would prefer to go by train.'


'Yes', to all your questions.

If you want to state your preference more strongly, you could say 'I prefer. . .' rather than 'I would prefer . . . '. (However, you can only say 'I would rather'.)

Clive
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Thank you very much, Clive.
Thank you Clive