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The "which" in " to which everything is referred" is the same as the "which" in "which he has thus gathered to himself"? That is, the both whichs refer to "mass"?

And what does "mass" mean?

Context:
To find excellences however dispersed, to discover beauties however concealed by the multitude of defects with which they are surrounded, can be the work only of him who, having a mind always alive to his art, has extended his views to all ages and to all schools, and has acquired from that comprehensive mass which he has thus gathered to himself, a well digested and perfect idea of his art, to which everything is referred.

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To find excellences, however dispersed, to discover beauties, however concealed by the multitude of defects with which they are surrounded, can be the work only of him who, having a mind always alive to his art, has extended his views to all ages and to all schools; and has acquired from that comprehensive mass which he has thus gathered to himself a well-digested and perfect idea of his art, to which everything is referred.


It's a sentence in "Albert Durer" by Thomas Sturge Moore (1905), isn't it? My interpretation is ; the first 'which' is 'that comprehensive mass' and the second 'which' is 'a well-digested and perfect idea of his art'. I guess the mass means the people of all ages and the students in all schools.
Comments  
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Then what does "mass" mean?
What is mass? Do you know physics? This writer uses "mass" here in the sense of physical mass, but he uses it metaphorically to imply talents of people. As a physical object of great mass attracts surrounding objects to it, Albert Durer (who was a person of greatest talent) attracted many talented people to him.

paco

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