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a. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, the pain centering around my navel.

b. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, the pain centered around my navel.

c. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, the pain of which centered around my navel.

d. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, the pain of which was centered around my navel.

e. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, whose pain was centered around my navel.

f. The most severe episode lasted approximately twenty hours, whose pain centered around my navel.

Thank you. Emotion: smile
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Comments  
I'd use only the first one. The present participle would be understood as dynamic, while the past participle (b) would most likely be taken as static. (Maybe that's what you want.) I use the terms naturally, not grammatically. (Navel piercing doesn't usually take twenty hours, does it?)

The other problem with (b) is that the emboldened part is a stand-alone sentence, which could add to the reader's confusion.
You could eliminate this by inserting "with." But we're still stuck with a static pain.
Of course you're playing with "centered" as a finite verb vs. "centered" as an adjective.
I'm not sure I'm up for listing why the others are bad. (drudgery) Emotion: zip it
Hi, Avangi

I guess my main concern was choosing the correct verb form. Which is correct?

a) The pain centered around my navel.

b) The pain was centered around my navel.

a could be re-written as my first example: the pain centering around...

while b could be re-written as: the pain (of which was) centered around...

Alas, 'the pain centered around' is slightly ambiguous is it not? 'Centered' could be seen as an adjective, where 'of which' is omitted (the pain of which was centered) or it could be seen as a finite verb, like in a in this post, right?

P.s. not a navel pierceing. Abdominal pain.
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Re the ambiguity in b) because of the passive vs. "to be" plus adj., it's just unavoidable with certain verbs. Adding "of which" doesn't seem to change it.
In some cases the meaning works out pretty much the same, in others, not.

In their present forms, a) & b) are both fine, ambiguity notwithstanding.

I may seem to be contradicting my earlier post, but I take the finite a) as more dynamic than the passive/adjective b). That is, the pain may be moving around somewhat in a).
In b), the past tense seems to imply that the act of centering (if passive) was completed at some point. Not quite true with the adjective, I'd say.
(You may not be interested in this aspect of it.) Emotion: smirking
Hi,

Only A and B seem natural to me. I prefer A, since the stress seems to be on the long period of time.

It doesn't seem natural to me to relate the pain to 'the episode', using 'whose' or 'of which', because it seems to suggest that the pain 'belongs to' the episode. It doesn't, to my way of thinking. It belongs to your stomach or at least to the area around your navel. The pain happened during the episode.

In pure grammar terms, the previous reference for 'of which ' or 'whose' might well be 'hours', which of course doesn't work at all.

Clive
I agree with Clive completely, and I apologize for being so lazy. At the time, the examples beyond a) and b) seemed too bizarre to analyze. Emotion: embarrassed
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Hi,

I apologize for being so lazy. At the time, the examples beyond a) and b) seemed too bizarre to analyze.

Don't apologize! I, too, find that sometimes the work of explaining why odd stuff is wrong outweighs the benefits. Emotion: thinking

Clive
AvangiRe the ambiguity in b) because of the passive vs. "to be" plus adj., it's just unavoidable with certain verbs. Adding "of which" doesn't seem to change it.

You mustn't be spotting the same ambiguity as me:

The pain centered around... Could mean either

1)The pain of which was centered... (passive)

2) The pain centered around... (active)

Oh, and never call yourself lazy, Avangi, of all people. Emotion: smile
I just wrote a very long post, but I scrapped it.
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