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It should be funtioning as a noun, as a direct object.

It should be functioning as a noun, a direct object.

It should be functioning as a noun, and as a direct object.

Which version is best?

I don't think and works, because it implies it is a noun and a direct object, even though they are the same thing
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Comments  
The last, without the comma. It can definitely function as both. A direct object is not necessarily a noun; they are not the same thing. The second sentence says that another word for 'noun' is 'a direct object'. The first sentence uses a style I wouldn't use in regular writing, and it also implies they are the same thing.

(By the way, I'd write, "It should be a noun functioning as a direct object." There is a difference between what a word is -- i.e., one of the eight parts of speech -- and what it's function or part of the sentence is.)
I would probably say it like

It should be funtioning both as a noun and (a) direct object.
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IvanhrI would probably say it like
It should be funtioning both as a noun and (a) direct object.

In that case it must be:

It should be functioning as both a noun and a direct object.

for proper parallellism with 'both'.
I think both are fine.
IvanhrI think both are fine.

But they aren't. In this case, 'both' must be followed by two phrases that are grammatically equivalent. In your sentence it is followed by a prepositional phrase and a noun phrase. You should move the 'as' in front of 'both' to turn what follows into two noun phrases.
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A direct object can act like a noun.
If this is what you wanted to say, Eng.
Greetings, English 1b3,

the sentences are structured so that certain misunderstanding may appear, caused by a syllogism in the judgement. A noun is an instance of form, while a direct object is representative of function. Therefore, coordinating these two units within the present statement leads us into thinking that a nounal word class is a manifestation of function, which it is not. It would be of use to know the antecedent of It, but, given the data available, I suggest the following correction:

The word 'X' (=It) is a noun (within the sentence) functioning as a direct object.

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff
ferdis
But they aren't. In this case, 'both' must be followed by two phrases that are grammatically equivalent. In your sentence it is followed by a prepositional phrase and a noun phrase. You should move the 'as' in front of 'both' to turn what follows into two noun phrases.

In the original post, it appears to me that it's unlikely to find "the absolute answer" among the three sentences.

If the noun and the direct object are one of the same, the comma <,> in # 3 is not necessary. The other 2 shouldn't even be used at all.

It should be functioning as a noun and as a direct object. The 2nd "as" may not be neccesary either.



Another option is to use the adverbial phrase "as +as " in place of the conjunction (and) in certain contexts.

This will eliminate the need for using "both" and the confusion with the comma. By the way, "as" can grammatically be placed in front of "both" or after. As a matter of fact, "both as" is more common.

That's how I see it! comments are welcome.Emotion: smile
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