I know that the relative pronoun "that" is used with restrictive clauses whereas "which" is used with non-restictive clauses. But I read in some books that"which"can be used both for restrictive and non restrictive clauses. I am getting confused. Emotion: sweating

If my understanding is correct, both sentences are possible right?

a. I like the bag which has a red ribbon.
b. The bag, which I like, has a red ribbon.

Could you give me other examples?

Thank you very much!

Sincerely,

pinayausie Emotion: star
pinayausieIf my understanding is correct, both sentences are possible right?

a. I like the bag which has a red ribbon.
b. The bag, which I like, has a red ribbon.
Both sentences are correct in the right context. They don't have the same meaning. Sentence b requires that the people involved in the discussion know which specific bag is talked about. The sentence may not sound very natural in many circumstances.
pinayausieBut I read in some books that"which" can be used both for restrictive and non restrictive clauses. I am getting confused. Emotion: sweating
No need to get confused! Your understanding is right and the rule applies in most cases. Americans in particular tend to avoid which in restrictive clauses. It is more common in British English.

Non-restrictive:
London, which is a beautiful city, is very old.
Last year he bought several CDs, which he still likes a lot.
He still likes all of them.

Restrictive:
Last year he bought several CDs which/that he still likes a lot.
He still likes some of the CDs he bought last year but not all of them.

CB
Thank you CB! I finally got it!