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A. I authored one of the internal controls of the department, which was the book vs. physical inventory control.
B. I authored one of the internal controls of the department, which is the book vs. physical inventory control.

1. Which of the sentences above is correct?
2. If both are OK, what is the difference?
3. Does using "was" in A means the control is no longer in place?
4. Does using "is" in B means the control is still in place currently?
5. If there's no difference, would you prefer A over B for tense matching with "authored"?

Thanks in advance for your kind assistance.
Comments  
Hi,
A. I authored one of the internal controls of the department, which was the book vs. physical inventory control.
B. I authored one of the internal controls of the department, which is the book vs. physical inventory control.

Some people find the term 'authored' ugly and a bit pretentious, and prefer the simpler verb word 'wrote'. The latter is, I think, more common in the business world.

Generally speaking, you should avoid repetition, eg of the word 'control',

Perhaps say eg ' . . . the book vs. physical inventory method / one.''

1. Which of the sentences above is correct? Both.

2. If both are OK, what is the difference? See below.

3. Does using "was" in A means the control is no longer in place? No. It may or may not be. We don't know.

4. Does using "is" in B means the control is still in place currently? Yes

5. If there's no difference, there is would you prefer A over B for tense matching with "authored"?

Clive
Thank you for your helpful response.

I would use 'wrote' instead. I rewrote my examples below per your suggestions.

A. I wrote one of the internal controls of the department, which was the book vs. physical inventory one.

B. I wrote one of the internal controls of the department, which is the book vs. physical inventory one.

The writing happened a year ago and I'm no longer part of that department. However, I believe the control I wrote is still in place there. Given the facts and considering that 'was' means the control may or may not be in place, while "is" means it is still in place, which would you naturally say at first thought: is or was?
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Hi,
I would use 'wrote' instead. I rewrote my examples below per your suggestions.

A. I wrote one of the internal controls of the department, which was the book vs. physical inventory one.

B. I wrote one of the internal controls of the department, which is the book vs. physical inventory one.

The writing happened a year ago and I'm no longer part of that department. However, I believe the control I wrote is still in place there. Given the facts and considering that 'was' means the control may or may not be in place, while "is" means it is still in place, which would you naturally say at first thought: is or was?

I prefer 'is', but I'd rather reword the whole sentence completely.
eg I developed one of the department's current internal controls, the book vs. physical inventory method.

'Develop' is a stronger verb than 'write'.
The explicit word 'current' makes the meaning clearer and more emphatic.

Clive
Again, thank you for your clarification.
Cliveeg I developed one of the department's current internal controls, the book vs. physical inventory method.
I wonder if I can also say "I've developed..." instead of "I developed..." give the same fact that I'm no longer part of the department because I resigned a year ago, although the internal control I developed is still in place and it's benefits is still currently felt.

If the present perfect is OK as well, which is ideal for an interview for this past accomplishment with a previous employer: have developed or developed?
Hi,

(missing image) Clive

“eg I developed one of the department's current internal controls, the book vs. physical inventory method.

I wonder if I can also say "I've developed..." instead of "I developed..." give the same fact that I'm no longer part of the department because I resigned a year ago, although the internal control I developed is still in place and it's benefits is still currently felt.

No, stick with the Simple Past.

If the present perfect is OK as well, which is ideal for an interview for this past accomplishment with a previous employer: have developed or developed?

Clive
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Thank you for your answer. That was really helpful.

I authored one of the internal controls of the department, which was the book vs. physical inventory control.