+0

While there are many general explanatory models of why organizational policies take the form that they do (see, for example, Sabatier 2007) most of these rely upon abstract assumptions about human behaviour, such as the claim that people employ forms of means-end rationality when deciding upon courses of action (Hindmoor 2006).


‘While’ can have several different roles, but in this sentence, what is it supposed to mean?

claim that people employ -> could you tell me how I can understand this part? (Can people employ claim??)

forms of means-end rationality -> this one also.

courses of action -> what does that mean?


thank you.

+0

While there are many general explanatory models of why organizational policies take the form that they do (see, for example, Sabatier 2007) most of these rely upon abstract assumptions about human behaviour, such as the claim that people employ forms of means-end rationality when deciding upon courses of action (Hindmoor 2006).


Let me try to say this more simply.

Although there are many explanations of why organizations choose their policies, most of these explanations are based on assumptions about human behaviour. An example of these assumptions is the claim that when people decide what to do, they think about whether the end justifies the means.


Does this answer all or at least some of your questions? If not, please ask again.
Clive

Comments  
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

I don’t understand -> the claim that when people decide what to, they think about whether the end justifies the means.

What does ‘the end justifies the means’ mean?

Broadly speaking, if you believe that the end justifies the means, you believe that it is OK to do bad things if the result is a very good thing.

eg It's OK to kill one person if by doing that you save the lives of 100 persons.


Clive