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Can "who" be used only with third person singular verbs in sentences like "Let's see who is online"
and "Who is coming ?"
Can't we use "are" in the above sentences instead of "is" to refer to plural nouns ?
Can we use "who all " ?
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Debpriya DeCan "who" be used only with third person singular verbs in sentences like "Let's see who is online"
and "Who is coming ?"
Yes. That is the standard way to use who.
Debpriya DeCan we use "who all " ?
You will sometimes hear this, but it doesn't necessarily trigger the use of are.

Let's see who all is there.
Let's see who all are there.

Who all is coming?
Who all are coming?

To my ear, the versions without all seem the more standard ways to say these things.

CJ
Debpriya DeCan "who" be used only with third person singular verbs in sentences like "Let's see who is online"
and "Who is coming ?"
Can't we use "are" in the above sentences instead of "is" to refer to plural nouns ?
In sentences like these, "who" takes the singular verb, irrespective of how many people it may refer to. (Other sentences structures may differ, such as when a plural noun directly follows, as in "Who are these people?", or when "who" is a relative pronoun, as in "the people who are coming to visit".)
Debpriya DeCan we use "who all " ?
Do you mean somehow use in your two sentences? I don't see how that would work.
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CalifJimLet's see who all is there.
Let's see who all are there.

Who all is coming?
Who all are coming?
Hmm. These sound very strange to me. I guess there are some dialect differences here.
Mr Wordydialect differences
Undoubtedly. American English, probably under the influence of The South, likes constructions with "all", e.g., who all, you all.

CJ
CalifJimUndoubtedly. American English, probably under the influence of The South, likes constructions with "all", e.g., who all, you all.
Yes, of course, I can visualise now the "y'all" usage from Southern American speakers. I didn't connect it with "who all".
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Does this rule apply to "what" as in "What is/are glowing in the distance ?
Debpriya DeDoes this rule apply to "what" as in "What is/are glowing in the distance ?
Yes, it's a similar idea. In this sentence you would use "is". If you want to emphasise the plurality of glowing objects, you can say "What are those things glowing in the distance?" (or substitute any other suitable plural word for "things").
I'd like to add a comment to what has been explained already.
Who -as explained, is typically taken as a singular noun. i.e. Who was sitting in my chair earlier? Who knows?
Who does the cleaning in your house?

However, there are contexts in which Plural is required. i.e. Who are those people at the lobby?
Who do you think you are barging in my office ?
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