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Hi,

John Writebooks, who is one of the most popular writers in the US, has written another book: "Engrish Grammer".

Ok, that's simple, third person and singular. But what if I have to use another person?

But you, who... ? ...one of the people in charge here, could try to explain the matter to Mr. Trouble.
Even I, who... ? ...not the kind of person who gets scared easily, wouldn't go there for less than 1,000 dollars.


Thanks Emotion: smile
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KooyeenHi,

John Writebooks, who is one of the most popular writers in the US, has written another book: "Engrish Grammer". (English Grammar)

Ok, that's simple, third person and singular. But what if I have to use another person?

But you, who... ? ...one of the people in charge here, could try to explain the matter to Mr. Trouble.
Even I, who... ? ...not the kind of person who gets scared easily, wouldn't go there for less than 1,000 dollars.

But you, who are one of the people in charge here, could try to explain the matter to Mr. Trouble.

Even I, who am not the kind of person who gets scared easily, wouldn't go there for less than 1,000 dollars.
I see, thanks.
I was wondering if that sounded formal or unusual. Is it common to use those structures that way? Thanks.
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Hi Kooyeen -- yes, I think "formal and unusual" is a good description! But you can't use any other verb forms in those sentences. The only way to make the sentences sound more natural would be to re-arrange them, like so:

"Even I wouldn't go there for less than $1,000, and I don't get scared easily!

Maybe you could try to explain the mattter to Mr. T. -- after all, you're one of the people in charge here!"

(There is a famous saying of this type -- "We, who are about to die, salute you!" I wasn't sure where it was from, but my daughter says this is what gladiators would say to the Roman emperor before entering the arena.)
John, who is ..., has ...
You, who are ..., have ...
I, who am ..., have ...


They all sound perfectly normal to me.
I don't sense anything excessively formal about them.
Rephrasings, as mentioned earlier in the thread, are also possible, of course.

CJ
LOL, another example of "two native speakers not really agreeing". Well, we all know we don't always talk the same way. So, thanks a lot, I understand. Emotion: smile
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Jim, what would you do with this one??

You, who are usually so convincing, have failed to persuade me, who ____ still skeptical.

Is? Am? Are? Re-write the whole darn thing?

Jim, what would you do with this one??

You, who are usually so convincing, have failed to persuade me, who ____ still skeptical.
Before or after my brain short circuited? Emotion: smile

Rewrite. Don't ask me how. That's left as an exercise for the reader. Emotion: smile

CJ
KhoffJim, what would you do with this one??

You, who are usually so convincing, have failed to persuade me, who ____ still skeptical.

Is? Am? Are? Re-write the whole darn thing?
I would use 'am' to fill in the blank.
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