+0
Who am I

The who is in the right case because it is a subject complement: I am who. Or would you use 'whom'?

I saw it written 'whom am I,' (no preposition preceding).

Is it very uncommon to use whom in America? I suppose the word is on its way out..

I have noticed the language is coming far more simple; I suppose this reform makes sense, just a thought.

Cheers.
Comments  
Since "AM" doesn't take an object (INtransitive Verb) "WHO" is correct. Written declaratively, the sentence is I AM WHO, though unless you're the progenitor of the the band WHO you'd never use the construction. And, Eddie, WHOM is still used, and used often, not only in the states but throughout the Enlgish-speaking word, as the objective form of the subjective WHO. "Give the letter to whomever answers the door." "Whom do you wish to ask to the party?"
Eddie88I saw it written 'whom am I,' (no preposition preceding).

Whoever wrote that was trying to sound "smart" and ended up instead showing ignorant.

Use "whom" right after a preposition. Can you describe the person to whom you delivered the package? (Even though we're more likely to say "the person you gave the package to.")

And I'm sorry, but it's whoever, not whomever, in the example above. See this excrutiating thread. http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/WhoeverVsWhomever/cxcp/post.htm Look for the posts by the people with the proficient speaker check or the teacher check.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Haha, that is one long thread thanks to the people about who think they know what they are talking.

Is this sentence above correct? (I know the prep can end the sentence as well)

Generally, I just get it right by analysing the sentence and determining what is the pronoun's role in the sentence is.

However, CJ's examples were rather confusing. Can you tell me why they are correct, please? A brief reason will suffice; I have some of them right I think. (just name their function within the clause basically).

Introduce whoever you think is the tallest to whoever you think is the shortest.
Introduce whomever you invited first to whomever you invited last.
Introduce whoever arrived first to whoever arrived last.

It is whoever you think it is.
It is whoever you think has made a mistake.
It is whoever has made the mistake.
It is whoever is knocking at the door.
It is whomever they designated the leader.
It is whomever you believe they sent.

Sorry to ask you do this; I'm sure you are sick of this discussion by now. I thought I had it all right, until I saw these examples.
Where you can say "he" it would be "whoever" and where you can say "him" it would be "whomever."
Eddie88Introduce whoever you think is the tallest to whoever you think is the shortest.
Introduce whomever you invited first to whomever you invited last. I invited him first, but I invited him last.
Introduce whoever arrived first to whoever arrived last. He arrived first, introduced to he who arrived last.

It is whoever you think it is. I think it is he (this one is a bit trickier, since we probably wouldn't say he.)
It is whoever you think has made a mistake. I think he made the mistake
It is whoever has made the mistake. He made the mistake
It is whoever is knocking at the door. He is knocking at the door
It is whomever they designated the leader. They designated him
It is whomever you believe they sent. I believe they sent him
Hi, thanks for that! However I'd also like to know the role the pronoun is playing in its clause as this is the way I usually figure out the case.

Ed
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
You can go backwards now: If it was "he," it was the subject of that clause, and if it was "him," it was the object of that clause.