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I have two questions.

1. I would like to know the meaning of the next sentence.

Who/Whom are we kidding?

2. I wonder why she said "A" instead of "B".

A: Whom are we kidding?

B: Who are we kidding?

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Comments  (Page 2) 
anonymousplease i wanna know, can we say "whom am i kidding? is it correct in the spoken & grammatical English
I would like to know if we can say "Whom am I kidding?" Is it grammatically correct in spoken English?

Note above how to ask your question.

It is grammatically correct, but not in casual modern English. It's much too formal. If such a slang-like expression should ever occur in the inaugural speech of a president, it might be done with "whom", but for most ordinary uses, it's "who".

CJ

My, I love our language. I believe "WHO are we kidding?" is grammatically

correct. "WHO should be used to refer to the subject of the sentence. WHOM

should be used to refer to the object of the verb or preposition."

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
anonymous

My, I love our language. I believe "WHO are we kidding?" is grammatically

correct. "WHO should be used to refer to the subject of the sentence. WHOM

should be used to refer to the object of the verb or preposition."

Your post makes no sense, anonymous.

In the sentence "Who are we kidding?" the subject of the verb is "we" and the object of the verb is "who." In interrogative sentences, the interrogative pronoun begins the sentence even if it is not the grammatical subject. The subject and verb are inverted.

The declarative sentence is:

We are kidding our mothers.

Who are we kidding?

Here is another example:

I have two books. Which one do you want?

"Which one" is the object of "want".