+0
Can "who" be used like "whom" colloquially or generally?
For example:He is whom I want to speak to.He is WHO I want to speak to.
+2
healerHe is whom I want to speak to.He is WHO I want to speak to.

Normal idiomatic version: He's the one I want to speak to.

CJ

+1

"Whom" is moribund. Use it only right after its preposition (often not even then), as in "He has three dogs, all of whom are corgis." Also, it must be used in fixed expressions like "to whom it may concern". It is still possible to cleave to grammar and use it always as the objective case of "who", but that usually sounds overnice today, and it can be harder than you think to tell when the objective case is called for.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  

Thanks. Can I say "He is WHO I want to speak to." then?

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
healer

Thanks. Can I say "He is WHO I want to speak to." then?

Sure. You can actually say anything you want to, but it won't necessarily be something that English speakers normally say, so if you say it, you may cause them to wonder why you said it like that. Emotion: smile

CJ

CalifJimSure.
Don't you think both" He is whom I want to speak to." and" He is WHO I want to speak to." do meet the grammar rules.I would usually say what you say too. That is"He's the one I want to speak to." But to me that is usually in conversation mode. I had supposed I could use either example in the original questions for formal situations. Of course it is like you all say "who" instead of "whom" is much more common these days.
Thanks!
healerDon't you think both" He is whom I want to speak to." and" He is WHO I want to speak to." do meet the grammar rules.

Yes, but as I said, just being correct grammatically is often not enough when you want to write or speak a new language effectively.

healerI would usually say what you say too. That is"He's the one I want to speak to."

Great. I'm glad to hear that. Emotion: smile

healerBut to me that is usually in conversation mode. I had supposed I could use either example in the original questions for formal situations.

Actually, no, those specific combinations of words are not formal. Both "He is who ..." and "He is whom ..." are better described as awkward. They just don't sound right, even in formal situations.

Of course there are other situations where 'whom' is more formal.

From most formal to least formal:

Tom is the only man whom I know at that company.
Tom is the only man who I know at that company.
Tom is the only man I know at that company.

CJ

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies