The following is part of my master's thesis. Can you help me correct my language? The format needn't correcting. Thank you so much.
1.4 A Brief Survey of Images of China in British Literature
=2E..(some parts are omitted here)
In the 19th century and early 20th century, China was mainly considered as a country of backwardness and stagnation and the images of China created by British writers were generally unfavorable. Sax Rohmer wrote his Fu Manchu series, in which the Chinese people were devils. His evil Chinese characters enhanced the conception of =93yellow peril=94 in Europe. However, Bertrand Russell, hoping to find the essence from the long-history China, visited China in 1920 and sang praise of Chinese civilization greatly in his famous book The Problem of China. W. S. Maugham described China from many aspects and the images of China are multi-faceted and they will be discussed in detail in the following part of this thesis.
On the whole, British writers never ceased to write about China and the images of china are different from writer to writer. The images of China, as said by Raymond Dawson in The Chinese Chameleon: An Analysis of European Conceptions of Chinese Civilization, are like a color- changing chameleon. China in the British writers=92 eyes =93has at one time or another been thought to be rich and poor, advanced and backward, wise and stupid, beautiful and ugly, strong and weak, honest and deceitful there is no end to the list of contradictory qualities which have been attributed to her.=94 The British writers create the images of China mainly according to their constantly changing needs and desires.
The following is part of my master's thesis. Can you help me correct my language? The format needn't correcting. Thank you so much.

Excellent. The only change I would make is to the sentence "The images of China, as said by Raymond Dawson in The Chinese Chameleon: An Analysis of European Conceptions of Chinese Civilization, are like a color-changing chameleon."
That comes across as a bit clumsy, and would be (to my mind) better turned round to the simpler form, "Raymond Dawson described the image of China as like a color- changing chameleon in The ..."

JS
However, Bertrand Russell, hoping to find the essence from the long-history China,

I'm not sure what you mean by that. "..hoping to find the essence of ancient China..." perhaps? Or "..hoping to find the essence of China distilled during its long history..."?
visited China in 1920 and sang praise of Chinese civilization greatly in his famous book The Problem of China.

The phrase in English is usually "..sang the praises of...", but as such is regarded as a cliche. Simply "..praised..." would do very well here.

Alan Pemberton
Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England
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