well, i am a chinese guy, my name in chinese is: Guo Linlin. Guo is my family name,and Linlin is my given name. now, i wanna hav an english name.but i hav some difficult in this. i`ll give some clues below,and i hope friends as you from english country can give me some advice.

as i know, some hongkong people use Kuo instead of "Guo"(=B9=F9), so i think in my new english name, my family name is still using Kuo.

the very thing is my given name. "Lin Lin"(=C1=D6=C1=D6=A3=A9means forest = in
chinese by its meaning.
the most favorite name is(ranked by myself):
1,Linlin Kuo
2,Forest Kuo (i think you might hav watched Forrest Gump,so what`s the meanding of forrest??)
3,Samuel Kuo(how do you like samuel?plz tell me)
4,David Kuo(i think the pronounciation of david in english is cool and sweet, ha)
no matter if you can help me, i`ll give my most thanks to you. of course ,plz give some advice.
thanks
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well, i am a chinese guy, my name in chinese is: Guo Linlin. Guo is my family name,and Linlin is ... do you like samuel?plz tell me) 4,David Kuo(i think the pronounciation of david in english is cool and sweet, ha)

Many years ago, when I was a teacher, I had somes student who had combined English and Chinese names. One example's Chinese name was Ng Shu Kay. His English name was Adrian Ng. On formal documents he wrote his name as Adrian Ng Shu Kay.
In your case I'd make the following observations:
1. In taking an English name I don't see any need to change the form ofyour family name (from Guo to Kuo) unless you particularly want to.
2. I think there are advantages of taking an easily-recognisable Englishgiven name. Some people, I'm one, when they come across a Chinese name are aware that in its Chinese form the family name comes first, but also aware that some Chinese people in England reverse the parts of the name (as "Linlin Kuo" in your case). So then when we come across a Chinese name for the first time (in a UK context), we don't know whether we're seeing it in its original Chinese form or in an Anglicised form, because we don't know enough about Chinese names to spot which part is the family name. So I'd suggest that "Linlin Kuo" wouldn't be particularly helpful in avoiding confusion.
3. "Forrest" in English has no particular meaning. It's just a name. Iguess that historically it is derived from "forest", but any direct connection is lost in the mists of history. Somebody will probably come along in a minute and prove me wrong about that!
4. However "Forrest" is a very unusual given name, ocurring more often as afamily name (in the UK, I don't know about anywhere else), so if you chose that one most people would immediately think of Forrest Gump, which may or may not be what you want.
5. Some people choosing English names choose a given name that sounds a bitlike their original one, or at least has the same initial. In your case, "Lionel" or "Leslie" could be possibilities.
5. If you like the sound of "David", I'd say go for it.

Mike Stevens
narrowboat Felis Catus III
web site www.mike-stevens.co.uk
No man is an island. So is Man.
well, i am a chinese guy, my name in chinese is: Guo Linlin. Guo is my family name,and Linlin is my given name. now, i wanna hav an english name.

Be proud of your Chinese name. There's really no need for an English one, as long as the English (and Americans, and Australians..) pronounce it acceptably. Linlin sounds fine to me, though perhaps the way I would say it (flat tone, equal emphasis on the syllables) would make it something silly in Chinese- I just don't know, but neither does (almost) anyone else over here! Most people are quite used to the idea of the first name being the family name too.
And we can cope with Guo as easily as Kuo, again with the warning above.

So how would you say my name in Chinese, and would it mean something silly? Please feel free to tell the truth!
Paul Burke
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
thanks, Mike,how do you think about "Linlin Guo " or "Guo Linlin(original chinese from)"?
what i want is is a name that make the people feel weird. to be better, it`ll conform to english name`s rules.
thanks again.
hi, paul,thanks for your reply.
"Lin", in chinese, we pronounce it like "lean"(li:n) in english.
LINLIN =E5=86=99=E9=81=93=EF=BC=9A
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
09:53, martedì 14 marzo 2006, LINLIN:
LINLIN 写道:

what i want is is a name that NOT make the people feel weird. to be better,

Linus?

°¿°
09:53, martedì 14 marzo 2006, LINLIN:

LINLIN ??:

Linus?

Lindsay?
ha ,i know Linus is the man who wrote the Linux operating system, and this OS was named for him,that is linus+unix. Linus is a Finn, is "linus" offen used in Britain or US?
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