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The follwing is an excerpt from BBC news:

Protesters have been demanding Mr Samak step down for weeks. They say he is a puppet for Thaksin Shinawatra, the former prime minister who the military accused of corruption and ousted in 2006.

My question is: should not it be "whom" instead of "who"?
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Use 'whom'.
Thanks Yoong.
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Use whom; it's the object of the verb accused.

If it were a passive construction, it would be who was accused.
AbilMy question is: should not it be "whom" instead of "who"?
Only in overly formal contexts. The way "who" was used is perfectly ok in virtually every context in modern English. Emotion: smile
Strictly speaking, as Philip also said, 'whom' should be used.
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Yoong LiatStrictly speaking, as Philip also said, 'whom' should be used.

Yes, but what do you mean by "strictly speaking"?
I think you only need to use "whom" that way if you have a teacher or editor who demands you use it. The use of "who" is now considered perfectly ok in pretty formal contexts too... In fact, the original poster's example came from BBC news.
Kooyeen
Yoong LiatStrictly speaking, as Philip also said, 'whom' should be used.

Yes, but what do you mean by "strictly speaking"?
I think you only need to use "whom" that way if you have a teacher or editor who demands you use it. The use of "who" is now considered perfectly ok in pretty formal contexts too...In fact, the original poster's example came from BBC news.

Sorry, but from what I've been hearing recently, even from so-called respected newscasters, I refuse to hold the news media as a standard! The most intelligent, literate and articulate reporting I've heard in the last many months was, quite unexpectedly, form those reporting the Olympics.

P.S. (edit): As a teacher, I demand it of myself, unless it will sound truly outrageous to the casual ear. I think we can still teach by example.
PhilipSorry, but from what I've been hearing recently, even from so-called respected newscasters, I refuse to hold the news media as a standard! The most intelligent, literate and articulate reporting I've heard in the last many months was, quite unexpectedly, form those reporting the Olympics.

I agree with Philip. Even journalists make mistakes sometimes. 'Whom' and 'who' are good examples. They use 'whom' when 'who' should be used and vice versa.
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