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Hi.

Who is used for the subject of the clause
Whom is used for the object of the clause

Is this when they are relative pronouns?

Does is mean that it is 'who' when it is the subject of the main clause or the relatvie clause?
Does this mean that it is 'whom' when it is the object of the main clause or the relative clause?

For example,

'This is who warned me' What is the subject etc in this sentence?

'Whom is this story about?' This is the subject in this sentence, but in the above one it is not. How come?
Comments  
"who" takes the case (subject, object) in the dependent clause.
I know the person to whom the book is dedicated. (object case)

I know the person who gave the dedication. (subject case)
I know the person whom the police arrested.. (object case)
The person whom the police arrested is going to be freed tomorrow.. (object case)

Your sentences:

1) This is who warned me.
Subject: this;
Verb: is;
Predicate; (dependent clause) "who warned me" - Subject "who"; verb - "warned"; direct object "me"
2) 'Whom is this story about?'
subject: story
verb: is
about - preposition
whom - object of the preposition. "about"

.
Excellent, thanks!

However, I have two questions based on your great answer:

Firstly, to clarify, will the 'who/whom' always be at the start of the dependent clause?

Secondly, Also, will it ever be in the main clause? For example, 'whom is this story about?'- there is no dependent clause.

The reason I ask these questions is because I want to have a method/process I go through to establish if it is who/whom. So, If I always seek out the dependent clause (by looking at the who/whom and it is to the right of this), and then if I decide if it is the object or subject of the sentence, I will be fine...

Or can it sometimes be the subject or object of the main clause?
And can it sometimes not begin the dependent clause?

Thanks.
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Excellent, thanks!

However, I have two questions based on your great answer:

Firstly, to clarify, will the 'who/whom' always be at the start of the dependent clause?

Secondly, will it ever be in the main clause? For example, 'whom is this story about?'- there is no dependent clause.

The reason I ask these questions is because I want to have a method/process I go through to establish if it is who/whom. So, If I always seek out the dependent clause (by looking at the who/whom and it is to the right of this), and then if I decide if it is the object or subject of the sentence, I will be fine...

Or can it sometimes be the subject or object of the main clause?
And can it sometimes not begin the dependent clause?

Thanks.
Excellent, thanks!

However, I have two questions based on your great answer:

Firstly, to clarify, will the 'who/whom' always be at the start of the dependent clause?

Secondly, will it ever be in the main clause? For example, 'whom is this story about?'- there is no dependent clause, so does that mean that you decide if it is the object/subject of the main clause, instead?

The reason I ask these questions is because I want to have a method/process I go through to establish if it is who/whom. So, If I always seek out the dependent clause (by looking at the who/whom and it is to the right of this), and then if I decide if it is the object or subject of the sentence, I will be fine...

Or can it sometimes be the subject or object of the main clause?
And can it sometimes not begin the dependent clause?

Thanks.

hey what you wrote is really confusing
r u asking a question or answering one

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Firstly, to clarify, will the 'who/whom' always be at the start of the dependent clause?
>> I think so. Most examples I have seen, who/whom is either the object of a proposition (starting the dependent clause), or very close to the noun that it references, and starting the dependent clause. Others may be able to find a counter example, though.

Secondly, Also, will it ever be in the main clause? For example, 'whom is this story about?'- there is no dependent clause.
>> Who / whom may be used in the main clause, mainly in questions. In indicative, mostly you will see who/whom in dependent clauses.
The reason I ask these questions is because I want to have a method/process I go through to establish if it is who/whom. So, If I always seek out the dependent clause (by looking at the who/whom and it is to the right of this), and then if I decide if it is the object or subject of the sentence, I will be fine...

Or can it sometimes be the subject or object of the main clause?
And can it sometimes not begin the dependent clause? .>> You will always recognize a dependent clause - it will have its own verb. I first look for all the verbs in a sentence, then put the other words into clauses by finding the subject, direct / indirect objects that go with the verbs. You do have to be a bit careful of the confusing verbals (gerunds, participles and infinitives) which are not fully verbs!
That is a great help thanks. I will now mainly look for the who/whom to be either the subject or object of the dependent (relative) clause.

Lastly, when I read information on the who/whom concept i came across this as a rule.

'whom is always the correct choice after a preposition'

Does this mean that if whom/who is BEFORE the preosition this rule does not apply?

And does this mean that if the whom/who has to be directly after the preosition or can it be at the end of a clause, for example?

Thanks.