+0
I decided to vote for whoever called me first.

I=subject
decided=main verb
to vote for whoever=prep phrase
called=verb
me=object

At first glimpse it may seem like whoever should be in the objective case; this is because it may seem like it is the object of the preposition FOR.

However, am I right to say that it should be in the nominative case because the whole prepositional phrase is, in fact, 'to vote for whovever called me first'

Then this would mean that whoever is the subject of the phrase. But a verb exists too (called)...This would mean it cannot be a prepositional PHRASE...but a clause...Noun clause...

Can someone answer my problems I am having above please.
1 2
Comments  
"Whoever" is the subject of the clause. The clause is the object of the preposition.
O.k. so let me get this right.

the whoever....is the noun clause. And whoever is the subject of the noun clause.

But if the noun clause was replaced by a single noun rather than a noun clause, it would be in objective form, correct?

Thanks.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
No.

To vote for is a phrasal verb. It's also what was decided. I suppose that makes the entire part that follows a giant noun phrase that tells you what the object of "decided" is.

"Whoever called me first" is the noun phrase that is the object of the phrasal verb "to vote for." (As "I voted for Obama" would have "Obama" is the noun phrase.)

"Whoever" is the subject of the dependent clause that servces as the noun phrase. (I'm not sure I've used the word "clause" correctly there - forgive me if I did not.)
Eddie88But if the noun clause was replaced by a single noun rather than a noun clause, it would be in objective form, correct?
As you probably know, nouns do not have objective "forms" in English. However, pronouns do:

- I decided to vote for that man.
- I decided to vote for him.
Eddie88 wrote:

<< But if the noun clause was replaced by a single noun rather than a noun clause, it would be in objective form, correct? >>

Right. You've got it. That's what confuses many people.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Excellent!

I'll try store this in the memory bank.

P.s. i asked you another questionon my other who/whom post.

Thanks a lot.
Hi, GrammarGeek, are you saying 'no' to my second answer (post) because Avangi says my second post is correct?

Thanks.

Here is how I now see it:

I decided to vote for whoever called me first.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I decided=main clause (this is a main clause, right? Or is decided a transitive verb in this case and needs the phrasal verb to be complete?)

I=subject
decided=main verb

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
to vote for=phrasal verb

to=preposition
vote=verb
for-preposition

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
whoever called me first=noun clause

whoever=subject (THEREFORE, IT IS NOMINATIVE CASE)
called=verb
me=object
first=adverb

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Is this all correct?

Thanks.
"to vote" is in the infinitive form. The "to" is not the preposition "to" but part of the verb.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more