Sir,

The man whom she married was a notorious drinker.
The man who she married was a notorious drinker.

Which one is correct?

Thanks.
1 2
Which one do you think is correct and why?
I think both of them are wrong. Am I true?
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Sir,

I think (1) is coorect, because "whom" refers back the noun,which is object of realtive clause.

Thanks.
hanuman 2000,

These questions usually give me fits as a native speaker.
The man whom she married was a notorious drinker.
The man who she married was a notorious drinker.

Which one is correct?


This is how I tackle these types of questions.

I know that "he" is a subject. He hit the ball.

I know that "him" is an object. He hit the ball to him.

Looking at our two sentences, we know that "she married him".

Who goes with subjects.
Whom goes with objects.

Thus, in proper or formal English, it is "whom". (Someone please double check to make sure I didn't goof.)

Here is a better explanation: [url="http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/pronouns.htm#who"][/url]

Fenerbahçeli is also correct. Unless you are using formal English, you can use "who" for both.

Please see: [url="http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/***.html"][/url]

I hope this explanation helps.

MountainHiker
And if I add "to" to the 2-d sentence, will it be correct in the formal English?
The man who she married to was a notorious drinker.
Or is it correct grammatically at all?
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Hi maverick88,

I am not sure of your purpose with the "to". But it doesn't seem to work for me.

I keep thinking "to whom she (was) married" but then I think "whom she married" is simpler. Perhaps someone else can join in.

MountainHiker
I suppose one difference could be:

1. 'The man whom she married was a notorious drinker' – he was a notorious drinker when they got married.

2. 'The man to whom she was married was a notorious drinker' – he may have taken up drinking after they got married.

'The man whom she was married to...' is an unhappy mixture of the formal and the informal. If you have to say it, you could blitz the relatives and go for 'The man she was married to was a notorious drinker'.

(No embittered Christmas reference intended in 'blitz the relatives'.)

MrP
You can say who AND whom, but whom, would be the most correct.
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