+0
1) Whom should I report to?

2) Who should I report to?

Which one is correct and why?

/Sameer
+0
askshameer1) Whom should I report to?

2) Who should I report to?

Which one is correct and why?

/Sameer

All of the following are correct. I have marked (<<<) the one which is most often used.

To whom should I report?
Whom should I report to?
Who should I report to?
<<<

CJ
1 2
Comments  
1. Whom should I report to is correct.

You use "whom" when it involves an objective pronoun and "who" when it involves a subjective pronoun.

Example:

1. Whom should I report to?
A: I should report to him.
-"him" is an objective pronoun so you use "whom".

2. Who bought the shirt?
A: He bought the shirt.
-"he" is a subjective pronoun so you use "who".

According to wikipedia:
"The English language subjective pronouns are I , you , he , she , it , we , what , who , and they . With the exception of you, it, and what, and in informal speech who, the objective pronouns are different i.e. me, him, her, us, whom and them."
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
1) Whom should I report to?
2) Who should I report to?
What Gilysse wrote is correct.
However, 'Who should I report to?' is not grammatcally wrong.
BUT it should be 'To whom should I report?'
1) Whom should I report to? 
2) Who should I report to?
What  Gilysse wrote is correct.
However, 'Who should I report to?' is not grammatically wrong.
BUT it should be 'To whom should I report?' 
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Whom should I report to?

Neither. The correct answer is "To whom should I report?"

Who is the report about or whom is the report about?

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

English has very little grammar compared with many other languages, less and less all the time. The who/whom distinction is in the process of dying. That means that there are two correct ways of handling it for now—ignoring case in most instances or adhering to the case distinction. The rule I follow for the most part is to only use "whom" when it immediately follows its preposition.

Your sentence becomes "Who is the report about?", even though technically it is "whom". To test whether it is technically correct to use "whom", change the sentence to a declarative form and look at the case of the pronoun: "The report is about him." "Him" is in the objective case, so it's "whom".

You can change your sentence to allow "whom" more naturally: "The report is about whom?" This is a little awkward, but it is likely in certain contexts and makes "whom" more likely. Even in this case, though, most people (in the US, anyway) would use "who" in informal speech because "whom" sounds prim.

Show more