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In the following sentence:

To my family, who I have missed so much.

Should I use whom instead of who?

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It depends on the level of formality. "whom" is technically correct, but nowadays "whom" is often replaced by "who" outside of formal writing.

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This very sad song was written after the death of his brother's wife who he was deep

FullMetal88

In the following sentence:

To my family, who I have missed so much.

Should I use whom instead of who?


ly in love with.

In this sentence “I” is the subject. “I” is doing the action and “family” is on the receiving end of the action—the object. So, you need to use whom to be grammatically correct. Who when referring to the subject and whom for the object.

paint build 210you need to use whom to be grammatically correct.

Not really. English does not operate by grammar. In English, grammar is only an attempt to talk about what we say. In modern English, "whom" is only seen immediately after its preposition, and not always then. You can still go to the trouble of figuring out which one to use, "who" or "whom", and if you use the one for the subjective case and the other for the objective case, you will not be wrong, but you will sound pedantic in all but the most formal settings.

Case in English is weak and is getting weaker. That is part of a trend that has been happening all along. English had a lot more grammar in the past and will have less and less as time goes on.

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