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1.The person who works at Microsoft is my sister.

2.The person working at Microsoft is my sister.


What is the slight difference in meaning or in use between #1 and #2?


Can we say only #2 when we refer to a person working now or temporarily ?, and is it correct to say only #1 when we refer to a person who works everyday at Microsoft?


I only learnt that if "who" is left out, #1 is going to be #2, so I'm asking whether it's always correct to leave out "who" in any context.

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That's an interesting question. I agree with your conclusion. The second sentence can be ambiguous.

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fire1I'm asking whether it's always correct to leave out "who" in any context.

No. The structure in your example #2 is not possible in a non-restrictive relative clause: Mr Brown, who works at Microsoft, didn't attend the meeting.

There is no difference in meaning in your sentences #1 and 2.

CB