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.. When the professor opened the drawer, did the professor ... leaving the intruder feeling like a good upchuck was needed?

I think all but the most alimentary of those themes appeared in the true/false statements.

and an
Alimentary, gentile alimentary,
Alimentary, je te plumerai.
Maria Conlon

The answer "true" is correct,

The question can be answered with "yes" or "no", among other things. It can't be answered with "true" or "false".

You, like Maria, are right, because I misquoted the statement. It wasn't actually a question. Delete the initial word 'was' and put a period for the question mark. Sorry!

john
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The question can be answered with "yes" or "no", among other things. It can't be answered with "true" or "false".

You, like Maria, are right, because I misquoted the statement. It wasn't actually a question. Delete the initial word 'was' and put a period for the question mark.

The resulting sentence no verb. I presume we are also meant to insert "was" after "drawer".
The version John first posted is equivalent to a statement that the drawer was opened by a man, and a question about that man. It is legitimately answered "yes", I think. This reasoning does not apply to the corrected version. If "man" means a male human, then I think the only legitimate response is that insufficient information was given to say that the statement is true or false.
However, "man" can also mean any human, and in that case...
Mark Brader, Toronto > "B-b-but laziness is the only virtue I have left!" (Email Removed) > Jutta Degener

My text in this article is in the public domain.
You, like Maria, are right, because I misquoted the statement. ... word 'was' and put a period for the question mark.

The resulting sentence no verb. I presume we are also meant to insert "was" after "drawer". The version John first ... to say that the statement is true or false. However, "man" can also mean any human, and in that case...

I see what you mean.
For the question, giving either a "yes" or a "no" answer would acknowledge that the professor was a man.
For the statement, answering "true" would acknowledge the prof was a man. Saying "false" would be saying the prof was a woman, but neither answer is really justified based on the information provided.

john
In a communications class I'm taking, there was an exercise to test quality of listening. The instructor read a paragraph, ... 'false' was that the question used the word "man", and there was no evidence that the professor was a man.

A space alien, perhaps, or a chimpanzee?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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Matti Lamprhey wrote on 01 Oct 2004:

Well I was only half-serious, but I respond to your ... the sex of the person who made the "sexism" charge.

You'll have to ask John why he specifically gave that detail. I find it interesting and revealing to know who ... of lie that says that "good, moral, and ethical people" all like to prepare and eat pablum all the time.

The problem, familiar to producers and consumers of news of all kinds, is not distortion or censorship but selection: John could have told us many things about the person who made the "sexism" charge whether they were young or old, smiling or frowning, admirable or contemptible in some manner; instead he just provided their sex. This was presumably because it was thought to be an important factor in our judgement of its validity. It was a sexist thing to do.

Matti
The problem, familiar to producers and consumers of news of all kinds, is not distortion or censorship but selection: John ... was thought to be an important factor in our judgement of its validity. It was a sexist thing to do.

I doubt it. The sex of the accuser *is* an important factor. I am more likely to take a charge of anti-woman sexism seriously if it is made by a person of that sex (GendStudE: 'gender'), just as I am more likely to take a charge of anti-black racism seriously if it is made by a person of that color. In those cases, it is possible that the -isms caused direct woe to the accusers (and an -ism without woe isn't an -ism, it's just a hobby). When the accuser is not female or not black, the only thing you can be sure of is that any woe is being imagined (GendStudE: 'empathised'). That is not necessarily a bad thing; it is necessarily a less authoritative (GendStudE: 'authoritarian') thing.

Take foxes. A fox is lying under a hedge, panting, while the hounds are two fields away trying to catch its scent again. If the fox's demeanour or behaviour tells me that it is suffering, I will listen. If, however, I can't see the fox and a non-fox (who also can't see the fox) tells me that the fox is suffering, I will be more sceptical.

Mickwick
In those cases, it is possible that the -isms caused direct woe to the accusers (and an -ism without woe isn't an -ism, it's just a hobby).

I have to love a man who views his schisms through so serious a prism. Hobbyist schismatics are just woeful.
Mike.
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In a communications class I'm taking,

And while we're at it, this sounds like a communication class, rather than one about transport and information networks.

Cue anecdote. The late Professor X was once seen sweating profusely over his bicycle, pumping hard at the front tire, which was already rock-solid. "Haven't you got enough air in it now?" "Yes, in this one; but the back one needs blowing up as well." "Well why don't you put the pump on the back one, then?" "Oh! Do they not communicate?"

Mike.
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