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I came across this sentence in a text I was issued for a seminar: "Give the package to (whoever, whomever) comes to the door." The correct response was listed as "whomever."
The rationale for this was: substitute "he" or "him," as in "give the package to him." Therefore, in this sentence, "whomever" is correct.

I called a local community college that has a grammar hotline, and their response was that "whomever" was correct because it was the object of the proposition "to." I then asked the hotline person what function "comes to the door" served in this sentence, and she responded that it modified whomever!

Please, someone back me up here. "Whoever comes to the door" is a noun clause that is the object of the preposition "to," actually functioning as an indirect object in this sentence. Within the clause, the subject is "whoever." By virtue of the fact that it is the subject, it has to be in the nominative case - whoever, rather than whomever.
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Comments  (Page 3) 
what about this

The title of salutatorian goes to whomever/whoever has the second highest academic average.
Whom/Who did you say this package was for?
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Anonymouswhat about this

The title of salutatorian goes to whomever/whoever has the second highest academic average.

Would you like to try first, Anon?

MrP
in fact now i realized that I'm ok with that one

The title of salutatorian goes to whoever has the second highest academic average.

(correct me if i'm wrong)

But what about the second one: Whom/Who did you say this package was for?

i'm soving some SAT prep. questions and the sentece is given like this:

Whom did you say this package was for?
and you should spot the mistake. i think that it's ok like this, but the answer is that whom is wrong.
I've been wanting to start a thread on this "whomever" for a long time; I've seen "whomever" used a lot of times when it should have been "whoever", so I'm glad to see the question settled.
The British are less correct than the Americans on this point and rarely use "whom" and "whomever" in speech.
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Anonymousin fact now i realized that I'm ok with that one

The title of salutatorian goes to whoever has the second highest academic average.

(correct me if i'm wrong)

Spot on.


But what about the second one: Whom/Who did you say this package was for?

i'm soving some SAT prep. questions and the sentece is given like this:

Whom did you say this package was for?

and you should spot the mistake. i think that it's ok like this, but the answer is that whom is wrong.

Very few people would say "Whom...for?". "Who...for?" is certainly the normal usage. But I would not say that "whom" was "wrong"; simply unusual.

Did the question specify "ordinary usage"?

MrP

So using 'whom' in speech marks one as non-native? Can you say it is best to reserve it for 'writing'?
Certainly in BrE it's mainly reserved for writing. The use of "whom" sounds quite formal, but then formal people exist! It's up to you when and whether you relax the rules, but it's best to make this decision when you're living in daily contact with native speakers.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
MrPedantic
Anonymous
in fact now i realized that I'm ok with that one

The title of salutatorian goes to whoever has the second highest academic average.

(correct me if i'm wrong)

Spot on.


But what about the second one: Whom/Who did you say this package was for?

i'm soving some SAT prep. questions and the sentece is given like this:

Whom did you say this package was for?

and you should spot the mistake. i think that it's ok like this, but the answer is that whom is wrong.

Very few people would say "Whom...for?". "Who...for?" is certainly the normal usage. But I would not say that "whom" was "wrong"; simply unusual.

Did the question specify "ordinary usage"?

MrP

no , it didn't. in fact i think it's better to be more formal.

ok, thanks anyway Emotion: smile

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