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Hello,

The majority of students whom he talked to, have a part-time job in the evening.

Thank you in advance.
Comments  
quaereeverumHello,
The majority of students whom he talked to have a part-time job in the evening.
Why did you put a comma after "to"?
whom (object of preposition to)
Some purists would insist on to whom he talked.
Some people would say that if you use the current sentence, 'whom' sounds out of place if 'to' is at the end. You'll have to go with whether you want to sound perfectly correct or you want to sound more natural. Keep in mind that the relative pronoun 'who(m)' can be eliminated in this case.
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Thank you very much. Emotion: roseI will follow your advice and say '' to whom'' he talked.
Dear Canada45, I used a coma to make a pause. Thanks for reminding me. Emotion: smile
Why not leave out whom and the comma? That would make your sentence better.

The majority of students he talked to have a part-time job in the evening.

CJ
Indeed, nice advice.Emotion: rose
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quaereeverum
I used a coma to make a pause.
1) Commas and pauses are not necessarily related.
2) If you put a comma there, you will separate the subject and predicate of the sentence.; there will be no independent clause. The whole sentence is one independent clause, so you cannot have.a comma in that sentence.
quaereeverumThank you very much. I will follow your advice and say '' to whom'' he talked.Dear Canada45, I used a coma to make a pause. Thanks for reminding me.
Please note that it should be 'comma'.
canadian45) If you put a comma there, you will separate the subject and predicate of the sentence; there will be no independent clause.
oops! Remove the period after "sentence".
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