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Would one ever see an advert such as this in an American newspaper or job website?

Posted 29 April 2006

Indian English teachers

Are you interested in teaching Indian English in the USA? Good payment,apartment/house, 40 hours working days/week, 3 months contract/6 months contract/1 year contract, enjoyable.

attn. Mr.Sures kumar
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Comments  
I'm sure there's something like that somewhere, as a joke. That would really be a laugh, because at least here, where it isn't often that you run into an Indian, they have the reputation of being very hard to understand.
Marvin A.I'm sure there's something like that somewhere, as a joke. That would really be a laugh, because at least here, where it isn't often that you run into an Indian, they have the reputation of being very hard to understand.
I was speaking seriously. If, as you say, Indian English speakers are difficult to understand, why don't American English speakers, who may wish or need to communicate with that group in the near future, learn Indian English?
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Milky
Marvin A.I'm sure there's something like that somewhere, as a joke. That would really be a laugh, because at least here, where it isn't often that you run into an Indian, they have the reputation of being very hard to understand.
I was speaking seriously. If, as you say, Indian English speakers are difficult to understand, why don't American English speakers, who may wish or need to communicate with that group in the near future, learn Indian English?
Wow, you're funny. What next, classes on understanding Chinese-English? Then perhaps Russian-English? You can't be serious. We don't really regard Indian-English as being a proper dialect of English, merely English spoken with an Indian accent, and grammatically influenced by the persons native tongue. The better the person knows English, the easier they will be to understand.
Indian English is a group of English dialects, with their own pronunciations and vocabularies. It is not just "English with an Indian accent," it is the variety of English spoken in India.
Indian English also has its own literature (e.g. V.S. Naipaul) and stylistic features (e.g. elaborate phrasing, use of idioms that would seem Wodehousian or old-fashioned to BrE speakers).

MrP
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<We don't really regard Indian-English as being a proper dialect of English, merely English spoken with an Indian accent, and grammatically influenced by the persons native tongue. >

Just who would that "we" be?
<<We don't really regard Indian-English as being a proper dialect of English, merely English spoken with an Indian accent, and grammatically influenced by the persons native tongue.Standard and non-standard dialects>>

A standard dialect (also known as a standardized dialect or "standard language ") is a dialect that is supported by institutions. Such institutional support may include government recognition or designation; presentation as being the "correct" form of a language in schools; published grammars, dictionaries, and textbooks that set forth a "correct" spoken and written form; and an extensive formal literature that employs that dialect (prose, poetry, nonfiction, etc.). There may be multiple standard dialects associated with a language. For example, Standard American English , Southern English , Standard British English , and Standard Indian English may all be said to be standard dialects of the English language .

A nonstandard dialect , like a standard dialect, has a complete vocabulary, grammar, and syntax, but is not the beneficiary of institutional support.

FYI

Indian English, the largest second language variety of English, is undergoing a process of structural nativization that leads to the variety developing a semi-autonomous norm-developing potential.

http://hrza1.hrz.uni-giessen.de/forschungsbericht/layout/einzel95.cfm?FB=05&Institut=2100&lfd_Nr=90p

Indian English belongs to NIVEs (Non-native Institutionalized Varieties of English), which strongly resemble forms which are found in learner languages and at one time may have been the result individual language acquisition. Yet these varieties, according to Williams's claims, have spread throughout the population and become institutionalized, thus becoming "regional standards"; moreover these NIVEs are now themselves the target of second language acquisitions.

http://www.ciil.org/Main/Announcement/MBE_Programme/session6/martinagosh.htm

Using the Optimality-theoretic insight that a grammar of a linguistic variety is a set of ranked constraints, I was able to provide an account of the theoretically problematic differences between two varieties of Indian English: vernacular Indian English (VIE) and standard Indian English (SIE). The differences between these two grammars are most conspicuous in the syntax of wh-questions, Focus, non-overt subjects/objects, and expletive (it) subjects. My research reveals that while VIE allows subject-verb inversion in indirect questions and forbids it in direct questions, the mirror opposite holds of SIE. VIE also allows non-overt subjects and objects as well as non-overt expletive subjects; these are disallowed in SIE. Finally, in VIE, but not in SIE, object noun phrases that are focused do not appear in positions where they are (Case) licensed. In my analysis (1995, 1997, 2000), I conclude that these grammatical differences arise due to different rankings of the same constraints, a theoretically desirable account.

http://www.linguistics.uiuc.edu/rbhatt/syntax_LanguageContact.htm
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