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Prior to this, I asked a simliar question and the answer was clear, so was my understanding.
But, a guy said,

"The company announced the plan whose content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta. "

can be modified as

"The company announced the plan of which the content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta."

This made me puzzled because in the former question I asked before, the noun after 'whose', or 'of which' functioned as an object of the verb in relative clause. However, here it functions as a subject.

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[previous question]

He's written a book whose name I've forgotten. ('name' is the object of 'forget')
He's written a book of which I've forgotten the name. (this is fine)

He has written a book of which the name I've forgotten. (this is incorrect.)

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So, Does this make any difference?

or is it still the same 'wrong' for the guy's compostion(...of which the content is...)?

Thanks in advance for your clarification.
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"The company announced the plan whose content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta. "

can be modified as

"The company announced the plan of which the content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta."

First of all here the expression 'plan whose content' seems odd as a plan is what it contains and thus there is nothing as plan when content is seen alone.
The company announced the plan whose content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta.

The company announced the plan of which the content is to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta.

Both are terribly awkward and should be abandoned (as I probably said before); in the first place, there is no point in mentioning 'content':

The company announced a plan to acquire all outstanding shares of C.I.H Corp. based in Alberta.
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I understand. I didn't actually quite see what the sentence was talking about. But, my focus is merely on the grammartical point rather than making it sound natural. This aside, the correction you made help me see better sentence construction. Anyway, back to the point I am concentrating on,
let me just make up sentences with which I can hopefully get my point across.

He's written a book whose name is on the list of best-selling novels.
He's written a book of which the name is on the list of best-selling novels.

All I am asking is if this composition is acceptable or not.
I am curious becasue 'the name' here serves as a subject as opposed to the previous question in which 'the name' was an object of the verb 'forget'.

Thank you very much.
I agree with MrM. I would just like to add that the possessive structure of which that you suggest is not very common, especially in informal style. It isn't often used even in literary style. I remember wondering about it ages ago when I was young and had to read a book entiled A Short History of English Literature written by Émile Legouis of The Sorbonne, Paris. The translators of his book liked the of which structure you use.

Usually:
He has written a book the name of which I have forgotten.
He has written a book whose name I have forgotten.
(Whose is mostly used in written English.)

CB
Thanks for clarification, CB.
Mr. Micawber once before helped me to make correction with this problem.
and I read other posts explaining distinction between whose and of which as being informal, formal.
When a guy said the original sentence could be convertible as such, I disagreed as I was taught by Mr. Micawber.
but soon I pondered if the different function of noun in the sentence could result in a different aspect of grammar. So just for the sake of clarificaition I am asking this. Please help~!
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Unfortunately I cannot express my thoughts on correct usage any more clearly than I already have done.

CB
Thank you, CB.
Then, I'll just stick to the usage I've been instructed by you and Mr.M.
Have a wonderful day!
I agree with you..
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