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Why dont you ask Clare about the tropics? She has been in Thailand.

It is possible that Clare lives in Edinburgh now and "has been to" means that she has gone and come back. But the book said "has been in" was correct.


I think the author thinks that she lives in Thailand while making the sentence and we don't know because there is not enough contexts.

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mosjaI think the author thinks that she lives in Thailand

I would not draw that conclusion.

Been to X => a short trip Emotion: poolparty to X.

Been in X => a longer time spent there; enough time to experience the seasons, the people's attitudes, traditions and culture, and appreciate the history of X.

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mosjaIt is possible that Clare lives in Edinburgh now and "has been to" means that she has gone and come back. But the book said "has been in" was correct.

"In" is fine, and it makes it sound more like she spent some time there. "To" is also fine, and more usual, and it makes it sound more like her sojourn was brief and superficial. But the distinctions are not fully embodied in the two words, and I think your book overstates the case. If you want to express the distinction infallibly, you have to say more: "She lived in Thailand for several years and was actually mauled by a tiger twice while tending her trapline."

mosjaI think the author thinks that she lives in Thailand while making the sentence and we don't know because there is not enough contexts.

No. That would be something like "She has been in Thailand for three years now."

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