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Please correct the following text:

Let me ask you another question here. Why is this very common in many cultures that after someone has died, no matter how worse or evil s/he was, people start to refer to him/her as if s/he was the only God's holy man and this world would not be the same without him/her anymore? I don't get it. In fact such people deserve a place in hell. In all their lives, they keep on doing bad things. I have seen people who offer prayers all day long and still they are the real incarnation of evil. Being a religious mean is something very different from what most people are used to think of. Would my good comments, especially when I don't mean them, make the deceased one less evil or more evil in front of the eyes of God?
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Hi,

A small background comment about your meaning.

There is an old saying in English, 'Never speak evil of the dead', ie 'don't say anything bad about a dead person'. It's a loose translation of a much older Latin quotation, de mortuis nil nisi bonum dicendum.

Refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_mortuis_nil_nisi_bonum

Obviously, there will be exceptions. eg People say bad things about Hitler.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
"No matter how worse" doesn't make sense because "worse" is the comparative degree of "bad." Someone can only be worse than someone else--not worse in their own right. "Being a religious mean is something very different from what most people are used to think of" also has some problems with clarity. Perhaps you mean, "Being religious means something very different from what people used to think."

As far as why people do this-I think it is probably out of concern for the family of the person who died. No one wants to be told that his mother was an evil person-especially when he is still grieving for her. It seems to me a harmless custom and one that considers the feelings of the bereaved.
Besides, who are we to judge? Someone that appeared to us to be a bad person might actually have been thought of very differently by others who saw a different side of the same person.
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Spides"No matter how worse" doesn't make sense because "worse" is the comparative degree of "bad." Someone can only be worse than someone else--not worse in their own right. "Being a religious mean is something very different from what most people are used to think of" also has some problems with clarity. Perhaps you mean, "Being religious means something very different from what people used to think."

As far as why people do this-I think it is probably out of concern for the family of the person who died. No one wants to be told that his mother was an evil person-especially when he is still grieving for her. It seems to me a harmless custom and one that considers the feelings of the bereaved.
Besides, who are we to judge? Someone that appeared to us to be a bad person might actually have been thought of very differently by others who saw a different side of the same person.
Thank you, Spides.
CliveHi,

A small background comment about your meaning.

There is an old saying in English, 'Never speak evil of the dead', ie 'don't say anything bad about a dead person'. It's a loose translation of a much older Latin quotation, de mortuis nil nisi bonum dicendum.

Refer to

Obviously, there will be exceptions. eg People say bad things about Hitler.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive, thank you for the information.
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