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Hi,

I would like to hear your opinion. "Do" forms are confusing me again. Emotion: smile

With or without "do" or both?

"You may wonder why I have two cars."
"You may wonder why do I have two cars."

If I am right questions without "do" are just short questions.
My Oxford Practical English Usage tells that it is possible to form short
questions without " do", for example:
- Have you an appointment? (formal BrE)
- Do you have an appoinment? (AmE/BrE)

but in modern English they are rather formal and uncommon and
they are not normally used in American English. So maybe that's the
answer and it should be in the following way:

"You may wonder why I have two cars."
"You may wonder why do I have two cars."

Anyone with me? Emotion: smile

Thanks
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Comments  
EagerSeekerHi,

IWith or without "do" or both?

"You may wonder why I have two cars." Correct form
"You may wonder why do I have two cars." Incorrect

- Have you an appointment? (formal BrE) Both are correct and mean the samething
- Do you have an appoinment? (AmE/BrE)

"You may wonder why I have two cars." This is correct
"You may wonder why do I have two cars." This is incorrect

This may help learners who are not sure about forming questions with auxilary words ! http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/frage.htm
"You may wonder why I have two cars."
"You may wonder why do I have two cars."
Hi,

As Goodman says, only the first one is correct,
From your post and your examples, I understand you've got Swann's book, right?
So, may I suggest another approach to clear your doubt?
That's an indirect question.
If you've got the same edition as me (the 3rd), have a look at section 276, "Indirect speech: questions and answers":

In reported questions the subject normally comes before the verb in standard English, and auxiliary do is not used.
- DIRECT: Where's Alice?
- INDIRECT: I asked where Alice was. (NOT ... where was Alice.)
...
- DIRECT: What do I need?
- INDIRECT: She asked what she needed. (NOT ... what did she need.)
...
If we try and use the same approach:

- DIRECT: Why do I have two cars?
- INDIRECT: You may wonder why I have two cars. (NOT ... why do I have two cars.)

Emotion: smile
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EagerSeekerYou may wonder why do I have two cars.
This is not incorrect, it emphatic.
EagerSeekerMy Oxford Practical English Usage tells that it is possible to form short
questions without " do", for example:
- Have you an appointment? (formal BrE)
- Do you have an appoinment? (AmE/BrE)
This variant is only possible with the verb have. It is irrelevant to your other concern.
The verb have aside, generally speaking, use do(es) for direct questions, that is, when the entire sentence is a question; otherwise, don't use do(es), as when the clause is embedded in a larger sentence.
See also Question about question

CJ
Huevos
EagerSeekerYou may wonder why do I have two cars.
This is not incorrect, it emphatic.

Can another member please confirm whether this is so?
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I agree with Huevos. However, for the sentence to work, it would have to use a different punctuation (i.e. "You may wonder: why do I have two cars?") I suppose this is what he meant by "emphatic".
Yoong LiatCan another member please confirm whether this is so?
It would also be used to show contrast:
Subject A: "You may wonder why I don't have two cars..."

Subject B: "And you may wonder why I do have two cars..."
Stressed.
Marvin and Huevos,

On second thoughts, I see your point about emphasis.

Huevos, any thoughts about the position of "do"? Yours is not in the same place as in the original poster's example...
EagerSeeker With or without "do" or both?

"You may wonder why I have two cars."
"You may wonder why do I have two cars."
HuevosSubject A: "You may wonder why I don't have two cars..."
Subject B: "And you may wonder why I do have two cars..."

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