The following article by David Graddol of the British Council in Hong Kong even suggests in my view that the days of the 'native speakers' are numbered.
http://www.britishcouncil.org/learning-research-english-next.pdf
The following article by David Graddol of the British Council in Hong Kong even suggests in my view that the days of the 'native speakers' are numbered. http://www.britishcouncil.org/learning-research-english-next.pdf

It suggests that the days of dominance and control over English abroad by 'native speakers' are numbered and that the English spoken abroad may become increasingly 'foreign' to them. That's not quite the same thing. I am unconvinced but probably won't be on the Earth long enough to find out whether I am right to be so.
The following article by David Graddol of the British Council in Hong Kong even suggests in my view that the days of the 'native speakers' are numbered. http://www.britishcouncil.org/learning-research-english-next.pdf

Graddol's report has been around for a long time, and builds on his previous 'The Future of English' and, largely, on the work of Professor Jennifer Jenkins (late of Kings College London but about to become my boss several times removed). Graddol is an independent consultant, he doesn't work for the British Council in Hong Kong or anywhere else.
Despite what Graddol and Jenkins have to say - and it's controversial in the biz - you still have to learn those phrasal verbs. DC