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Would it be grammatically okay to say the following?

"Why I want money is for buying an electronic dictionary that speaks."

"Why I want money is to buy it."

"The reason I want money is -same sentences as the above two-"

"I want money wanting it."

"Wanting money because I want it."

Generally if you would like to say as those, do you say simply such as "I want money because I want it."?

Thank you very much.
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The reason I would like the money is to buy an electronic dictionary.

Starting a sentence with the word 'why' usually implies a question (but not always).
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AchamoThe reason I want money is
This is the pattern you want. Add an infinitive clause to finish the sentence.

The reason I want money is [to pay the bills / to buy some clothes / to buy a dictionary].

AchamoI want money wanting it.
This doesn't make sense. You can't use this.

AchamoWanting money because I want it.
Same. You can't use this.

CJ
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Comments  
Thank you for your reply. Thank you for your reply. I see that the word "why" is basically not used in starting a sentence as a positive sentence. I was wondering if you could answer further questions, please.
JohnParisThe reason I would like the money is to buy an electronic dictionary.
1. Is it better to add the word "the" before "money" in this case?

2. Would it be wrong to say "The reason I would like the money is for buying an electronic dictionary."

3. Are "I want money wanting it." and "Wanting money because I want it." wrong sentences?

Thank you.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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I understand. I wanted to use participial construction, but I am not sure when I can use it.

Please let me ask about it in another thread here someday. Emotion: smile Thank you very much, CalifJim.